Former Hoover media fellow Philip Taubman discusses an unlikely effort by a group of former statesmen, including three Hoover fellows, to rid the world of nuclear weapons

Thursday, January 4, 2007
Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb.
Image credit: 
Rod Searcey
Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb.
Image credit: 
Rod Searcey

Five men who helped build, maintain, and wield America's nuclear arsenal have emerged as an unlikely group trying to rid the world of those very weapons. Since declaring in a 2007 Wall Street Journal op-ed their commitment to eliminating the nuclear threat, veterans of the Cold War and members of the Nuclear Security Project, including former secretary of state and Hoover fellow George Shultz; former secretary of defense and Hoover fellow William Perry; former secretary of state Henry Kissinger; and former senator Sam Nunn, have pressed governments to reduce their arms and better secure plutonium and other materials used to make nuclear weapons. In addition to the op-ed, they joined together to form the Nuclear Security Project to galvanize global action to reduce urgent nuclear dangers and build support for reducing reliance on nuclear weapons, ultimately ending them as a threat to the world. Hoover fellow Sidney Drell is and has been instrumental in his support for the Nuclear Security Project. Their efforts are chronicled in The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb, a new book by Philip Taubman.

In this interview, Taubman discusses what makes the group so compelling.

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