Alice Hill

Research Fellow
Research Team: 
Biography: 

Alice C. Hill is a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution where her work focuses on building resilience to destabilizing catastrophic events, including the impacts of climate change. Prior to joining Hoover, she served as Special Assistant to President Barack Obama and Senior Director for Resilience for the National Security Council. While at the White House, Hill led the development of national policy regarding national security and climate change, incorporation of climate resilience considerations into international development, Federal efforts in the Arctic, building national capabilities for long-term drought resilience, and establishment of national risk management standards for three of the most damaging natural hazards. She served as a member of several U.S. delegations, including to the GLACIER Conference regarding climate change in the Arctic. Hill previously served as Senior Counselor to the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and as an ex officio member of the Federal Advisory Committee for the Third National Climate Assessment. In addition, she led the DHS Task Force responsible for creating the first ever climate adaptation plans for the Department. She is also the founder and first Chairperson of the internationally recognized Blue Campaign, an initiative to combat human trafficking.

Prior to her work in Washington, Hill served as Supervising Judge on both the Superior and Municipal Courts in Los Angeles and as Chief of the white-collar crime prosecution unit in the Los Angeles United States Attorney’s Office.

Hill is a frequent speaker and has been quoted in the NY Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times, among other publications. She has appeared on CBS, NPR, and MSNBC and her written commentary has been published in Newsweek, LawFare, The Hill, and other media.

She received her BA from Stanford University and JD from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

We’ve Failed To Secure Our Coasts — We Must Build Resilience Before It’s Too Late

by Alice Hill, Roger-Mark De Souza, Katharine J. Mach, Christopher B. Field, Meaghan E. Parkervia The Hill
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

As record-setting rains pummel South Texas and Ellicott City struggles to recover from another deadly flood, we are experiencing more reminders that the United States is facing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. Last year’s hurricane season was the most expensive season to date — and arguably one of the most deadly on record. In the eight months since Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria struck our shores, are our coastal areas better prepared for the coming storms?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Building Coastal Resilience For Greater US Security

by Alice Hill, Roger-Mark De Souza, Christopher B. Field, Meaghan E. Parker, Katharine J. Machvia Analysis
Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Drawing from a series of discussions convened by the Hoover Institution, the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, this essay explores the challenges facing our coastal communities in a series of discussions designed to advance US resilience to climate change impacts, strengthen the sustainability and economic security of coastal infrastructure, and enhance national security.

Featured CommentaryAnalysis and Commentary

“A New Normal”: California’s Increasing Wildfire Risk And What To Do About It

by Alice Hill, William Kakenmastervia Eureka
Thursday, May 24, 2018

As soon as it hit in October 2017, officials knew the Tubbs Fire was serious. “It’s real bad,” said Cal Fire Battalion Chief Marshall Tuberville. “This is an example of nature in control.”

IntellectionsFeatured

Building Resilient Infrastructure

by Alice Hillvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

America’s existing infrastructure hasn’t been built to deal with the natural disasters we’ll face this century. New and replacement infrastructure must be built to be resilient to future climate disruptions. While it may sound costly, the return to building resilient infrastructure will save more money in the long run.

Analysis and Commentary

Ignoring Climate Change Only Compounds Its National Security Risks

by Alice Hillvia Axios
Thursday, May 17, 2018

President Trump’s Defense Department cut all but 1 of 23 mentions of “climate change” from the final draft of a Congressionally mandated report on climate risks — increased flooding, drought, wildfire and extreme temperatures — to U.S. military installations.

Analysis and Commentary

A Primer On Resilience

by Alice Hillvia The Bulletin
Friday, April 6, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Alice Hill analyzes the rising use of the term "resilience."

Analysis and Commentary

An Overview Of “Resilience” And Climate Change

by Alice Hill, William Kakenmastervia Taylor and Francis Online
Monday, February 19, 2018

What do we mean when we speak in terms of “resilience?” Why has “resilience” become the hot buzzword, and why is it useful for political leaders who want to avoid saying the words “climate change?” Will the choice of words make a difference when it comes to the need to design infrastructure – roads, bridges, tunnels, houses, factories, power plants, airports, railroads – with rising sea levels, increased storms, and hotter temperatures in mind?

Analysis and Commentary

New York’s Uphill Climb Vs. Big Oil: Winning In Court Will Be A Tough Task Indeed

by Alice Hillvia NY Daily News
Saturday, January 20, 2018

New York City just filed suit in federal court against five multinational oil companies: ExxonMobil, Chevron, Conoco Phillips, BP, and Royal Dutch Shell. The goal? To get monetary damages for the harm New York has already suffered from climate change impacts — coastal erosion, increased flooding and higher temperatures — and help with paying for the necessary investments to protect against future harm.

Analysis and Commentary

Think Small To Weather Big Storms

by Alice Hillvia Foreign Policy
Wednesday, January 17, 2018

[Subscription Required] At two minutes to noon on Sept. 1, 1923, the ground began to tremble in Tokyo and nearby Yokohama. A 7.9 magnitude earthquake had struck Japan. The shaking lasted for nearly five minutes, causing gas stoves to topple, which in turn ignited thousands of wooden buildings. The fires eventually claimed more lives than the quake itself — more than 140,000 people died in all. 

Pages