Anne Boustead

Biography: 

Anne Boustead is an assistant professor at the School of Government & Public Policy at the University of Arizona, where she researches surveillance, privacy, policing, and drug policy.  She has a PhD from the Pardee RAND Graduate School, where her dissertation focused on law enforcement use of commercially collected data, and a JD from Fordham University School of Law.

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Analysis and Commentary

Small Towns, Big Companies: How Surveillance Intermediaries Affect Small And Midsize Law Enforcement Agencies

by Anne Bousteadvia Lawfare
Monday, February 12, 2018

As Justice Samuel Alito noted in United States v. Jones, “[i]n the pre-computer age, the greatest protections of privacy were neither constitutional nor statutory, but practical.” Nevertheless, there has been increasing recognition that practical protections for privacy do not dissipate entirely when digital-age government officials seek commercially collected information.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Small Towns, Big Companies: How Surveillance Intermediaries Affect Small And Midsize Law Enforcement Agencies

by Anne Bousteadvia Aegis Paper Series
Wednesday, February 7, 2018

This paper explores how efforts by companies to resist government requests for consumer information may disproportionately affect small and mid-sized law enforcement agencies, as small departments face obstacles to using commercially collected information that do not occur in the context of larger departments. Differences between law enforcement agencies that serve large communities and those that serve small communities suggest corresponding differences in their ability to adapt to changes in the process for obtaining data from digital communication companies.  Failing to account for these differences may encourage policies that will only work as expected for large law enforcement agencies.