Daniel P. Kessler

Keith and Jan Hurlbut Senior Fellow
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Biography: 

Daniel Kessler is the Keith and Jan Hurlbut Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on economics, public policy, and the health care industry. He is also a professor at the Stanford Law School and a professor, by courtesy, of health research and policy in the School of Medicine.

Among his publications are, with Mark McClellan, “The Effect of Hospital Ownership on Medical Productivity,” in the RAND Journal of Economics (2002), and “Designing Hospital Antitrust Policy to Promote Social Welfare,” which appeared in Frontiers in Health Policy Research. His books include a forthcoming second edition of Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Five Steps to a Better Health Care System (Hoover Institution Press, 2011), coauthored with Leonard and Shirley Ely Senior Fellow John Cogan and R. Glenn Hubbard, and Regulation versus Litigation: Perspectives from Economics and Law (University of Chicago Press, 2010).

He is the holder of a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a JD from Stanford Law School.

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Cost Shifting in California Hospitals: What Is the Effect on Private Payers?

by Daniel P. Kesslervia California Foundation for Commerce and Education
Wednesday, June 6, 2007

The extent to which health care providers cost shift -- increase the price or markup charged to one group of patients in response to a decrease in another group's price or markup -- has been the subject of extensive and long-standing policy debates...

The Uninsured’s Hidden Tax on Health Insurance Premiums in California

by John F. Cogan, Matthew Gunn, Daniel P. Kessler, Evan J. Lodesvia Analysis
Sunday, April 1, 2007

The basic premise behindmany recent California health-care reform plans is that Californians who have health insurance bear a large part of the financial burden of the health-care services provided to the uninsured. Doctors and hospitals, by charging insured persons systematically higher prices for health-care services, shift the costs of treating the uninsured onto the insured. These higher charges cause higher health insurance premiums— California’s ‘‘hidden tax.’’ According to reform advocates, the hidden tax is so large that the reforms, which include mandates and new taxes, will actually reduce those premiums.

Medicine for What Ails Us

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, April 30, 2006

Health savings accounts will give consumers more choices and control spiraling health-care costs. Sound like a no-brainer? It is. By John P. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

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Reforming Malpractice Liability

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

The medical liability system functions less like a rational compensation scheme and more like a lottery. How to take luck out of the equation. By Daniel P. Kessler.

Analysis and Commentary

Three Proposals for Malpractice Liability Reform

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, August 24, 2005

Patients and their health-care providers should be given more freedom to experiment with alternatives to the courts.

Analysis and Commentary

Reforming Malpractice Liability

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, August 17, 2005

According to the Institute of Medicine, between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths a year are caused by medical mistakes.

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Reforming Health Care

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, January 30, 2005

The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. How the president can revive it. By Daniel P. Kessler.

Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise

by Daniel P. Kessler, John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 2004

The American health care system is broken. Here’s how to fix it. By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

Analysis and Commentary

For-Profit Hospitals Lead to Gains in Productivity

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, August 25, 2003

Should nonprofit and public hospitals be allowed to convert to for-profit status and, if so, with what restrictions?

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