Keith Eiler
Expertise: 

Keith Eiler

Biography: 

Keith E. Eiler, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a retired lieutenant colonel of the U.S. Army, died on November 16, 2005.

Eiler's academic work centered on military history. His Mobilizing America: Robert P. Patterson and the War Effort, 1940–1945, a major treatise on U.S. economic and military mobilization during World War II, received the Hoover Institution's Uncommon Book Award in 1999. He then began research on the military-operational aspects of the war, which led to a study of General Albert C. Wedemeyer, the U.S. War Department's most prominent strategist and an officer who later commanded U.S. forces in the China theater and whom Eiler had served as an aide-de-camp.

Eiler graduated from the U. S. Military Academy in 1944 and went on to serve during World War II with the Third U.S. Army in Europe, where he was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge; during the Korean War, he served with the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea.

Eiler holds masters' degrees in civil engineering (Harvard University) and international affairs (George Washington University) and a doctorate in the history of American civilization from Harvard.

(2005)

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Recent Commentary

An Uncommon Soldier

by Keith Eilervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

A reflection on the remarkable career of General Albert Coady Wedemeyer, "one of America’s most distinguished soldiers and patriots." By Hoover fellow Keith E. Eiler.

The Man Who Planned the Victory

by Keith Eilervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, October 30, 2001

A special full-length online version of Keith E. Eiler's interview with A.C. Wedemeyer.

Judge Robert P. Patterson

The Man Who Mobilized America

by Keith Eilervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 30, 1997

At the outbreak of World War II, the United States found itself with a weak, outmoded military and a civilian population utterly unprepared for the shock of total war. Serving as undersecretary of war, Judge Robert P. Patterson mobilized the nation. An appreciation by Keith E. Eiler.