Larry Diamond

Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award
(2007)
Richard W. Lyman Award
(2013)
Kenneth M. Cuthbertson Award
(2016)
Biography: 

Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. For more than six years, he directed FSI’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, where he now leads its Program on Arab Reform and Democracy and its Global Digital Policy Incubator. He is the founding coeditor of the Journal of Democracy and also serves as senior consultant at the International Forum for Democratic Studies of the National Endowment for Democracy. His research focuses on democratic trends and conditions around the world and on policies and reforms to defend and advance democracy. His forthcoming book, Ill Winds:  Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, analyzes the challenges confronting liberal democracy in the U.S. and around the world at this potential “hinge in history,” and offers an agenda for strengthening and defending democracy at home and abroad. He is now writing a textbook and preparing a massive open online course (MOOC) on democratic development. Diamond’s other books include In Search of Democracy 2016), The Spirit of Democracy (2008), Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation (1999), Promoting Democracy in the 1990s (1995), and Class, Ethnicity, and Democracy in Nigeria (1989). He has also edited or coedited more than forty books on democratic development around the world. He directed the Stanford Program on Democracy in Taiwan for more than ten years and has been a regular visitor to Taiwan since 1995.

During 2002–03, Diamond served as a consultant to the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and was a contributing author of its report Foreign Aid in the National Interest. He has also advised and lectured to universities and think tanks around the world, and to the World Bank, the United Nations, the State Department, and other governmental and nongovernmental agencies dealing with governance and development. During the first three months of 2004, Diamond served as a senior adviser on governance to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad. His 2005 book, Squandered Victory: The American Occupation and the Bungled Effort to Bring Democracy to Iraq, was one of the first books to critically analyze America's postwar engagement in Iraq.

Among Diamond’s edited books are Democracy in Decline?; Democratization and Authoritarianism in the Arab World; Will China Democratize?; and Liberation Technology: Social Media and the Struggle for Democracy, all edited with Marc F. Plattner; and Politics and Culture in Contemporary Iran, with Abbas Milani. With Juan J. Linz and Seymour Martin Lipset, he edited the series, Democracy in Developing Countries, which helped to shape a new generation of comparative study of democratic development.

Diamond writes a monthly column for The American Interest and frequently consults on policies and programs to promote democracy.

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Recent Commentary

Featured

China’s Surveillance State Should Scare Everyone

by Anna Rose Mitchell, Larry Diamondvia Defense One
Monday, February 5, 2018

The country is perfecting a vast network of digital espionage as a means of social control—with implications for democracies worldwide.

Featured

This Sputnik Moment

by Larry Diamondvia The American Interest
Monday, December 18, 2017

As authoritarian states like China double down on strategic investments and project their “sharp power” abroad, the United States may finally be reaching a new Sputnik moment.

Featured

How To Reverse The Degradation Of Our Politics

by Larry Diamondvia The American Interest
Friday, November 10, 2017

To fix democracy globally, we must first address toxic partisanship and polarization here at home. A promising electoral experiment in Maine might show the way.

Is There a Crisis of Liberal Democracy?

by Larry Diamond
Friday, October 13, 2017

We have entered a new era in which two great-power adversaries are threatening our democratic way of life with great subtlety and sophistication.

Analysis and Commentary

Who Rules In The Digital Age?

by Larry Diamond, Abbas Milanivia Stanford Alumni
Friday, September 15, 2017

How do we balance the right to free speech on digital platforms with other important values—security, civility and privacy? How have authoritarian regimes in the Middle East responded to the Arab Spring, and what role is social media currently playing the region? In these two recent Stanford event recordings, faculty and academic experts explore these timely, complex topics.

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Creeping Autocracy

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 7, 2017

The greatest risk to democracy? Not the prospect of a coup or a junta but the self-aggrandizement of “strong leaders.” 

Analysis and Commentary

Democracy Only As Strong As Citizens’ Support For It

by Larry Diamondvia San Francisco Chronicle
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Democracies are unique in the extent to which their stability depends on legitimacy — a belief on the part of the public that the system of government in the country has what Seymour Martin Lipset called “a moral title to rule.”

Featured

A 'City On A Hill' As A Fortress In A Moat

by Abbas Milani, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaulvia The Atlantic
Friday, February 3, 2017

The notion that one form of prejudice can defeat another is an illusion.

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Visions of Democracy

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 27, 2017

Global democracy is in trouble, and Donald Trump can either help it or harm it. Where will he lead? 

Featured

The Middle East’s Next Moment Of Reckoning

by Larry Diamondvia Project Syndicate
Friday, January 20, 2017

When the Arab Spring erupted in December 2010, advocates for change in the Arab world had reason to be hopeful. But, as we saw in 2016, authoritarianism has returned, and whether that trend can be reversed in 2017 will depend on how well regional and international leaders have absorbed lessons from the recent past.

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