Margaret (Macke) Raymond

Distinguished Research Fellow
Biography: 

Margaret “Macke” Raymond has served as founder and director of the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) at Stanford University since its inception in 1999. 

The CREDO team conducts rigorous and independent analysis and evaluation of promising programs that aim to improve outcomes for students in US K-12 public schools.  Their mantra is “We let the data speak.”  The team conducts large-scale analyses under a collaboration with 30 state education agencies. 

Macke has steered the group to be a well-regarded source of impartial insight into the performance and workings of charter schools, city reform strategies and national reform programs.  CREDO’s studies and reports are relied upon by the US Department of Education, governors, state chief school officers, state legislators, the courts, other policy makers and the media.  Supporters and opponents alike point to CREDO findings, moving the debate past evidence disputes to more substantive arguments.   

She is a regular source for local and national media, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and the Denver Post.  Macke’s deep belief in building capacity for improved analysis of programs and policy has found its place through service on advisory boards, technical resource groups and peer review panels.  She was selected as a Pahara-Aspen Education Fellow in recognition of her leadership in US education policy.

In addition, Macke created a visiting “CREDO-ship” to invite promising policy analysts to visit with the team and collaborate on projects of mutual interest.  Macke and her husband Eric Hanushek live in Stanford, CA with their yellow Labrador Retriever, Sugar.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

In the News

Kafer: Our Students Have Already Sacrificed Too Much In The Theatre Of Hygiene

featuring Eric Hanushek, Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Denver Post
Monday, August 16, 2021

[Subscription Required] We were actors in a theatre of hygiene. Every morning staff checked students’ temperatures with forehead thermometers as they entered school. Coming in from the cold winter air invariably lowered the digital reading by four or five degrees. Upon arrival, I, too, dutifully took my temperature and recorded it on the staff roster. On paper we all had hypothermia.

Featured

The Education Exchange: Redesign High School For Mastery And For Career And College Readiness

by Paul E. Peterson interview with Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia The Education Exchange
Monday, June 7, 2021

A Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institute, Macke Raymond, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss Raymond’s research on the structural imperfections of high schools, how the Covid-19 pandemic laid bare these problems, and how the high school experience can be improved.

Introduction | How to Improve Our Schools in the Post-COVID Era

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Education Success Initiative | The Papers
Thursday, May 6, 2021

Perhaps no issue is more important to American prosperity than the education of our citizens. Our nation’s schools serve more than fifty-six million students each day, and their success is essential to our long-term economic progress, our national security, and our civic life.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Learning Losses - What To Do About Them

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Education Success Initiative | The Papers
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

In early 2020, education leaders across the globe watched in dread as the coronavirus pandemic unfolded, with dire consequences for schools and those attending them. Dealt a hand of bad to worse options, they conscientiously chose to protect educators and students by closing school buildings, sending everyone home, and redirecting educators to instruct remotely. Local conditions—both medical and political—continue to shape the course of the 2020–21 school year, resulting in a slate of arrangements including schools in various states of openness, millions of children still trying to learn from home, and continued disruption to normal education activities.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

COVID-19, High School, And The “Both And” World

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Education Success Initiative | The Papers
Saturday, May 1, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought into sharp focus many of the structural imperfections of American high schools: unequal educational opportunity for significant numbers of students, weak adherence to course content that would adequately prepare students for life after high school, and incoherent pathways that leave many students with a dead-end diploma.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Conclusions | How To Improve Our Schools In The Post-COVID Era

by Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Education Success Initiative | The Papers
Tuesday, April 27, 2021

As the nation transitions from a public health focus in its schools to their education role, it is important to have a clear discussion of the direction and goals of America’s schools. There is no doubt that a key element of the nation’s historic strength and success has been the broad education of its citizens. But even before the pandemic there was vigorous discussion of how the schools could deal with new demands from the economy and do so in a more equitable way. The pandemic has amplified the need for picking up on this prior discussion and for making its desired improvements a reality.

In the News

Grading Charter Schools

quoting Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia The Week
Saturday, April 3, 2021

Independent alternatives to public schools have sprung up across the nation. Are they succeeding?

Office HoursFeatured

Office Hours: Macke Raymond Talks "Summer Slide" And The Learning Losses From Covid-19

interview with Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Hoover Institution distinguished research fellow Macke Raymond answers the most frequently asked questions from her video "An Endless Summer: How COVID Has Reversed Academic Achievement."

Policy InsightsAnalysis and Commentary

International Women’s Day

featuring Elizabeth Economy, Margaret (Macke) Raymond, Amy Zegart, Jacquelyn Schneidervia PolicyEd
Thursday, March 11, 2021

International Women’s Day is a globally significant day in which we honor women’s social, economic, social, cultural, and political contributions. To celebrate International Women’s Day, we’re highlighting four of our female Hoover Institution fellows who are leading and transforming their respective fields.

International Women’s Day

featuring the work of Elizabeth Economy, Jacquelyn Schneider, Margaret (Macke) Raymond, Amy Zegartvia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Thursday, March 11, 2021

International Women’s Day is a globally significant day in which we honor women’s social, economic, social, cultural, and political contributions. To celebrate International Women’s Day, we’re highlighting four of our female Hoover Institution fellows who are leading and transforming their respective fields.

Pages

Center for Research on Education Outcomes

Learn more about Raymond and her work at CREDO from the CREDO website.