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Paul Ehrlich

Biography: 

Bing Professor of Population Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University; Coauthor, One with Nineveh: Politics, Consumption, and the Human Future.

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Recent Commentary

TIME HAS COME TODAY: Global Population and Consumption

with Paul Ehrlich, Steven Haywardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 28, 2004

In 1990 the United Nations forecast that world population would peak at around 11 billion by the middle of this century. Now many experts believe the peak will be closer to 8 or 9 billion people. Is this slowing of global population growth good news for the earth's environment? Or do we still need to worry about the dangers of overpopulation and overconsumption? Peter Robinson speaks with Paul Ehrlich and Steven Hayward.

THE POPULATION BOMB REDUX: Is Population Growth a Problem?

with Nicholas Eberstadt, Paul Ehrlichvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, November 12, 2002

In the past century the earth's human population has quadrupled, growing from 1.5 billion in 1900 to about 6 billion today. By 2050, it is estimated that the global population will reach 9 billion. In 1968, a young biologist named Paul Ehrlich wrote a best-selling book called The Population Bomb, which sparked an ongoing debate about the dangers of overpopulation. He argued that population growth was destroying the ecological systems necessary to sustain life. So just how worried should we be? Is population growth a problem or not? And if so, what should we do about it?

DARWIN'S GHOST: Sociobiology and Human Behavior

with Paul Ehrlich, Jeffrey Schloss, Lionel Tigervia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 1, 2001

What can evolutionary science tell us about human behavior? During the past thirty years, biologists, anthropologists, and psychologists have begun applying Darwinian concepts, such as natural selection and survival of the fittest, to the study of behavior. Are social characteristics, such as aggression, love, and courtship, determined by our evolutionary past and encoded into our genes like physical attributes, such as walking upright or hair color? Are we slaves to our DNA, or does genetic determinism fail to explain fully what it means to be human?

IT'S THE BIOLOGY, STUPID: The Policy Implications of Sociobiology

with Paul Ehrlich, Jeffrey Schloss, Lionel Tigervia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 1, 2001

Behavioral scientists have begun to argue that the findings of evolutionary science should have legal, political, and moral consequences. If behaviors such as procreation, aggression, or homosexuality are determined more by our biology than by our free will, then it is foolish, these scientists argue, to ignore that evidence. Does evolutionary science have any place in public policy? How useful is the knowledge of our biological evolution in determining the values of our legal, social, and political system?