Rose Gottemoeller

Research Fellow
Research Team: 
Biography: 

Rose Gottemoeller is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. She also serves as the Frank E. and Arthur W. Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and its Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). 

Before joining Stanford, Gottemoeller was the deputy secretary general of NATO from 2016 to 2019, helping to drive forward NATO’s adaptation to new security challenges in Europe and in the fight against terrorism. Prior to NATO, she served for nearly five years as the under secretary for arms control and international security at the US Department of State, advising the secretary of state on arms control, nonproliferation and political-military affairs. As assistant secretary of state for arms control, verification and compliance in 2009–10, she was the chief US negotiator of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) with the Russian Federation. 

Prior to her government service, Gottemoeller was a senior associate with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, with joint appointments to the Nonproliferation and Russia programs. She served as the director of the Carnegie Moscow Center from 2006 to 2008 and is currently a nonresident fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program.  

At Stanford, Gottemoeller will teach and mentor students in the Ford Dorsey Master’s in International Policy program and the CISAC Honors program; contribute to policy research and outreach activities; and convene workshops, seminars, and other events relating to her areas of expertise, including nuclear security, Russian relations, the NATO alliance, EU cooperation, and nonproliferation. 

Filter By:

Topic

Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Rethinking Nuclear Arms Control

by Rose Gottemoellervia The Washington Quarterly
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

The former NATO Deputy Secretary General argues that arms control is not “dead,” as it seems fashionable to proclaim these days, but has three futures when in the national interest: immediate successes, such as extending New START, to regain momentum; medium-term, to confront new and complex issues; and distant, to embrace new technologies.

Interviews

Rose Gottemoeller: Nuclear Disarmament

interview with Rose Gottemoellervia WOSU (OH)
Thursday, August 6, 2020
Hoover Institution fellow Rose Gottemoeller discusses nuclear arms and disarmament.

Force Reductions and Redeployment: Part 1

with George P. Shultz, David Holloway, Rose Gottemoeller, James Goodby, Bruce Blairvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, October 24, 2007

Force Reductions and Redeployment: Part 1, the first session from the Hoover Institution's Reykjavik Revisited: Steps Toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons conference. The event features discussants James Goodby, David Holloway, Bruce Blair and Rose Gottemoeller.

Force Reductions and Redeployment: Part 2

with George P. Shultz, Sam Nunn, Henry A. Kissinger, Rose Gottemoeller, Bruce Blairvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, October 24, 2007

Force Reductions and Redeployment: Part 2, the first session from the Hoover Institution's Reykjavik Revisited: Steps Toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons conference. The event features discussants James Goodby, David Holloway, Bruce Blair and Rose Gottemoeller.(1:41:36)