Terry Anderson

John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow
Biography: 

Terry L. Anderson has been a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution since 1998 and is currently the John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow. He is the past president of the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, MT, and a Professor Emeritus at Montana State University where he won many teaching awards during his 25 year career.

Anderson is one of the founders of “free market environmentalism,” the idea of using markets and property rights to solve environmental problems, and in 2015 published the third edition of his co-authored book by that title. He is author or editor of 39 books, including most recently, Unlocking the Wealth of Indian Nations (2016), exploring the institutional underpinnings of American Indian reservation economies.

In addition to publishing in professional journals, Terry Anderson speaks around the world and is often featured in the popular press, including frequent editorials in the Wall Street Journal. Dr. Anderson received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1972 and has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University, Basel University, Clemson University, and Cornell, and a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Canterbury.

Terry is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys fly fishing, hiking, skiing, horseback riding, and archery hunting.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

No Wonder The Standing Rock Sioux Opposed The Pipeline

by Terry Anderson, Shawn Reganvia National Review
Monday, December 12, 2016
Because of stifling federal regulations, they had no chance to benefit from it.
Featured

Presidential Medal Of Freedom Should Come With Freedom For American Indians

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Today, November 22, Blackfeet tribal leader Elouise Cobell will be among 21 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The White House announcement cites Cobell’s efforts to found the Native American Bank and her inspiration to Native American women as the reasons for the award, but her most notable legacy is the case of Cobell v. Salazar.

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The Wealth Of (Indian) Nations

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Many reservations are mired in poverty even though they sit on vast stores of natural resources.

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Indian Energy Wars

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Thursday, October 6, 2016

Protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) are the latest Indian Wars. They pit Indian Nations against energy developers, tribes against tribes, and, tribes against the federal government, the last being the most formidable foe of all.

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Make Our National Parks Self-Sufficient

by Terry Andersonvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Early on, the parks were managed autonomously and entrepreneurially—which is precisely what they need today to thrive. 

During his tenure as Secretary of Commerce from 1921 to 1928, Hoover debated with colleagues in the Department of the Interior over whether or not airports and scenic airplane rides should be allowed in national parks. By the late 1920s airports were bein
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Happy 100th Birthday, National Parks

by Terry Andersonvia Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Yellowstone could cover its operating budget with a daily fee of $11. Glacier could do so for $7.19.

Just The Fracts

Top 5 Reasons Fracking Regulations Are Whack

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

The current approach to mitigating hydraulic fracturing’s risks is top-down, command-and-control government regulation. But this system is highly inefficient and ineffective at balancing the risks and rewards of fracturing. Why? Regulation imposes costs on consumers, typically benefits special interests, limits competition, and shields bad actors from liability. Meanwhile, property rights and water markets can better mitigate the risks, while also promoting the benefits.

Analysis and Commentary

The Native American Coal War

by Terry Andersonvia Forbes
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

When the Indian Wars ended after Custer’s demise at the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Native Americans found themselves relegated to reservations. Thereafter followed their next war, one to stave off poverty and protect what little wealth they had left.

Featured

Earth Day 2016: Let's Ditch The Doom And Gloom And Celebrate Our Improving Environment

by Terry Anderson quoting Carson Brunovia Fox News
Friday, April 22, 2016

Predictions of environmental gloom and doom meet us at every turn. At the entry of the Chicago Field Museum, for example, is a digital clock reporting “the number of species that have gone extinct since 8:00 this morning”—31 by 1 p.m. on March 27, 2016. Discussions of climate change almost always include terms such as catastrophic, irreversible, and irreparable. 

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Ending The California Coastal Commission Lolly Scramble

by Terry Andersonvia Eureka
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Coming from the “big sky country” of Montana where beautiful views are common around every bend in the road, I am still impressed by the green hills overlooking Point Reyes, the coastal cliffs plunging into the Pacific at Big Sur, and the vistas at San Simeon once enjoyed by Randolph Hearst.

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