Thomas W. Gilligan

Tad and Dianne Taube Director
Biography: 

Thomas W. Gilligan assumed the role of the Tad and Dianne Taube Director of the Hoover Institution in September of 2015.  A scholar in economics and political science, Gilligan also serves as a senior fellow at Hoover.  Gilligan has had a long-standing relationship with the Hoover Institution and Stanford University serving as a Hoover national fellow in 1989-90 and a visiting faculty member at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business in 1989-90 and again in 1994.
 
Prior to joining the Hoover Institution, Gilligan was dean of the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and most distinguished business schools in the United States. Before that, Gilligan held several key administrative roles at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. Most notable positions included interim Dean, Vice Dean of Undergraduate Education, director of the Ph.D. program, and Chair of the Finance and Business Economics Department. Gilligan holds the Centennial Chair in Business Education Leadership.
 
Gilligan received his B.A. in 1979 at the University of Oklahoma and his Ph.D. in Economics at Washington University in 1984. He taught Economics at the California Institute of Technology (1984-1987) and during his tenure at USC he held visiting appointments at Stanford University (1989-1990 and 1994) and Northwestern University (1995-1996). He was a staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House. He also served in the United States Air Force from 1972-1976.

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Recent Commentary

American Exceptionalism in a New Era

by Thomas W. Gilliganvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Thursday, June 7, 2018

In American Exceptionalism in a New Era, editor Thomas W. Gilligan, director of the Hoover Institution, has compiled thirteen essays by Hoover fellows that discuss the unique factors that have historically set America apart from other nations and show how America and its people have prospered and emerged as global leaders by prizing individuality and economic freedom and explore key factors in America’s success, including immigration, education, divided government, light regulation, low taxes, and social mobility. America isn’t perfect, they argue, but it is exceptional.