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Eureka

Why Los Angeles’ Homelessness Approach Is Working—With The Right Ingredients

by Colleen Murphyvia Eureka
Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Homelessness is on the rise across California. From Kern County to Alameda County, the housing crisis and economic disparities are pushing more and more people into homelessness.

Eureka

How San Diego Cleaned Up Its Act—And Got Real On Homelessness

by Kevin Faulconervia Eureka
Wednesday, October 30, 2019

As the mayor of San Diego, I recently visited a new housing complex for veterans to meet a man named Brian. I had heard he was thankful that city crews cleaned up tents that homeless individuals had set up underneath a freeway overpass.

Young Adults
Eureka

A New Approach: Adult Foster Care For The Homeless

by Michael S. Bernstamvia Eureka
Wednesday, October 30, 2019

On his visit to California in September 2019, President Donald J. Trump underscored the urgency of the homeless crisis in America’s largest state. On the eve of his visit, the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers issued a special report, “The State of Homelessness in America.” It attributes the problem, correctly, “to decades of misguided and faulty policies” and proposes deregulation of the housing markets, among other solutions.

Eureka

California’s Homelessness Crisis: The Beginning Of The End, The End Of The Beginning—Or No End In Sight?

by Bill Whalenvia Eureka
Wednesday, October 30, 2019

By most measures, Gavin Newsom has had a productive 2019.

an image
Education

Seattle Schools Propose To Teach That Math Education Is Racist—Will California Be Far Behind?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, October 29, 2019

California’s latest K–12 test scores were released earlier this month. Despite spending 26 percent more per pupil after inflation since 2011, test scores remain low, and improvement is proceeding at a glacial pace. Just 40 percent of California schoolchildren are proficient at math. What should be done? Seattle’s idea is to teach their students that US math education is racist, is used to oppress people of color and the disadvantaged, and has been used to exploit natural resources.

Politics

Never Give A Sucker An Even Break, Unless You’re California’s Governor

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, October 24, 2019

To verify the adage “What a difference a year makes,” look no further than the recently concluded bill-signing season in Sacramento, a one-month stretch from mid-September to mid-October during which California’s governor approves or vetoes pending legislation (matters on which the governor doesn’t act automatically become law).

Environment

Lights Out At The Hotel California

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, October 17, 2019

Where Were You When the Lights Went Out? is a 1968 romantic comedy starring Doris Day, who plays an actress caught in the great Northeastern blackout of November 1965 (like many a Day film, she accidentally ends up in bed with the wrong guy, yet manages to keep her virtue intact).

Politics

By Placing Profits Over Principles, The NBA Shows What It's Really Made Of

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Last week, Daryl Morey, the general manager of the NBA’s Houston Rockets, tweeted “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong” in support of Hong Kong citizen protests against mainland China. These seemingly harmless seven words created a political firestorm within the world’s premier basketball league that shows that the NBA’s highly publicized and proud commitment to social justice, freedom, and equality is largely abandoned when such principles affect their bottom line.  

Politics

Columbus Sailed The Ocean Blue . . . Only To Flounder In California

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, October 10, 2019

History shows that Christopher Columbus crossed an ocean and found dry land during this month in 1492, lost his flagship off the coast of Haiti just two months later, then died the following decade an exonerated man with his wealth restored (though the whereabouts of his remains is still contested).

Politics

The Intriguing Economics Of College Athletes Licensing Their Images

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Last week, California governor Gavin Newsom signed into law California’s Fair Pay to Play Act, which will allow California college athletes to sign commercial deals for the use of their identities and likenesses.  The law, which will also allow student athletes to hire agents to negotiate on their behalf, will take effect in 2023. This could be the law that upsets the NCAA’s long-standing cozy apple cart that has successfully funneled almost all collegiate athletic revenue to universities, and the economics of this law are fascinating.

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California on Your Mind is a twice weekly journal about California politics and economic policies, and how they affect California’s economy. At one time, California policies helped create the “California Dream” by fostering affordable housing, creating high quality schools, and facilitating substantial infrastructure investments. These policies helped make California the 20th century destination for thousands of businesses, and for tens of millions of Americans who moved to California from other parts of the country. Today, a very different set of state and local policies is contributing to rapidly increasing housing prices, growing homelessness, lower quality schools, and insufficient public investments.

This journal discusses California political and policy developments in real time, describes how they will affect the California economy, and analyzes how reasonable policy reforms can reduce California’s cost of living, improve California schools, increase public investment, and help restore the “California Dream”.

 

About the Authors

Lee Ohanian

Lee E. Ohanian is Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor of Economics at UCLA. He is an adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and previously has advised other Federal Reserve Banks, Foreign Central Banks, and the National Science Foundation. He has been an economic adviser to state and national political campaigns and has testified to the U.S. Senate and the California State Legislative Assembly on economic policy issues. His research, which recently has been discussed in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media sources, focuses on economic policies and economic growth, and as been published widely in a number of peer-reviewed journals. He is a frequent columnist for the Wall Street Journal. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Rochester.

 

Bill Whalen, a Hoover Institution research fellow since 1999, writes and comments on California and America’s political landscapes. Whalen is a columnist for the Sacramento Bee and Forbes.com and also writes frequently for Real Clear Politics, The Hill and the Washington Times. He is also the host of Hoover’s Area 45 podcast that explores policymaking and politics as they pertain to the Trump presidency. Prior to joining the Hoover Institution, Whalen served as chief speechwriter and director of public affairs for former California governor Pete Wilson. He’s also served as a strategist for numerous California political hopefuls, including former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. A native of Washington, D.C., Whalen received a B.A. in journalism from Washington & Lee University. ​