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Business

Will Mandatory “Unconscious Bias” Training For California Health Workers Actually Reduce Patient Deaths?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, May 7, 2019

California lawmakers are introducing a set of bills that would require state healthcare workers to undergo “implicit bias and racism” training every two years. The reason? Maternal mortality rates among black women are about three times as high as for non-Hispanic white women, Hispanic women, and Asian women. 

Politics

What May And May Not Be In California, Now That The Calendar’s Turned To May

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, May 2, 2019

As far as California state government is concerned, think of the next couple of the weeks in the Sacramento as the quiet before the storm—that disturbance coming when Governor Gavin Newsom announces the “May revise” to his January budget proposal, based on April’s revenue flow.

Eureka

The Road (And Rail And Reservoirs) Ahead: Can California Be Innovative—And Sensible?

by Bill Whalenvia Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

A quick look around the nation shows states making clever, necessary transportation improvements—even if the progress doesn’t occur overnight.

Eureka

A Better Use For California High-Speed Rail Funds: Repurposing Federal Money To Water Storage

by Kevin McCarthy via Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

California has a long history of expanding access to water, Earth’s most precious resource.

Eureka

It’s Time For California To Create A Safer, More Reliable, And More Resilient Surface Transportation System

by Karen Philbrickvia Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

With California’s population expected to reach 50 million by 2050, incremental improvements will not be enough to sufficiently expand mobility. Smart solutions are needed—innovative approaches to mobility that combine new technologies with nontraditional tools to address transportation challenges that are becoming increasingly complex.

Eureka

California’s Grapevine to Sacramento in Three Hours . . . in Your Car?

by John Moorlachvia Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

One of the great things about California is that we build the future. From Bill Hewlett and David Packard at the tail end of the 1930s, through Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in the 1970s, to all our great tech companies today, the Golden State has blazed a path of innovation. All of that was built first on imagination.

Business

At $140,000 Per Year, Why Are Government Workers In California Paid Twice As Much As Private Sector Workers?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Nationwide, government-worker compensation has been growing more rapidly than private-sector compensation for several years, but this trend is on steroids in California, where some state and local government workers are now paid roughly twice as much as those in the private sector.

Environment

Earth (Day) To Governor Newsom: Why Didn’t You Ban Fracking?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, April 25, 2019

Some Californians give Earth Day a symbolic nod—picking up litter on a beach, riding a bicycle to work to spare the air.

Housing

What Do You Call A $70 Million Trailer Park? Insanity? No, It’s Called “Low-Income Housing”

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Welcome to the world of the $70 million trailer park, which could only happen in California.

Pages

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California on Your Mind is a twice weekly journal about California politics and economic policies, and how they affect California’s economy. At one time, California policies helped create the “California Dream” by fostering affordable housing, creating high quality schools, and facilitating substantial infrastructure investments. These policies helped make California the 20th century destination for thousands of businesses, and for tens of millions of Americans who moved to California from other parts of the country. Today, a very different set of state and local policies is contributing to rapidly increasing housing prices, growing homelessness, lower quality schools, and insufficient public investments.

This journal discusses California political and policy developments in real time, describes how they will affect the California economy, and analyzes how reasonable policy reforms can reduce California’s cost of living, improve California schools, increase public investment, and help restore the “California Dream”.

 

About the Authors

Lee Ohanian

Lee E. Ohanian is Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor of Economics at UCLA. He is an adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and previously has advised other Federal Reserve Banks, Foreign Central Banks, and the National Science Foundation. He has been an economic adviser to state and national political campaigns and has testified to the U.S. Senate and the California State Legislative Assembly on economic policy issues. His research, which recently has been discussed in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media sources, focuses on economic policies and economic growth, and as been published widely in a number of peer-reviewed journals. He is a frequent columnist for the Wall Street Journal. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Rochester.

 

Bill Whalen, a Hoover Institution research fellow since 1999, writes and comments on California and America’s political landscapes. Whalen is a columnist for the Sacramento Bee and Forbes.com and also writes frequently for Real Clear Politics, The Hill and the Washington Times. He is also the host of Hoover’s Area 45 podcast that explores policymaking and politics as they pertain to the Trump presidency. Prior to joining the Hoover Institution, Whalen served as chief speechwriter and director of public affairs for former California governor Pete Wilson. He’s also served as a strategist for numerous California political hopefuls, including former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. A native of Washington, D.C., Whalen received a B.A. in journalism from Washington & Lee University. ​