Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

A Different View On The President’s Delegation Of Declassification Authority To The Attorney General

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Saturday, June 1, 2019

President Trump’s delegation of a narrowly defined declassification authority to Attorney General Bill Barr has attracted criticism, notably on this site by my colleagues David Kris and Benjamin Wittes. I think these criticisms tell only one side of the story, and that the matter is more complicated than they let on.

Featured

What Took So Long For Women To Win The Right To Vote? Racism Is One Reason.

by Elizabeth Cobbsvia The Washington Post
Sunday, June 2, 2019

One hundred years ago, on June 4, 1919, Congress approved by joint resolution a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote, sending the amendment to the states for ratification. After seven decades of campaigning, the women’s suffrage movement was on the cusp of realizing its goal.

Featured

A Tale Of Two State Visits

by Niall Fergusonvia The Boston Globe
Monday, June 3, 2019

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity.” Thus Charles Dickens begins “A Tale of Two Cities.” Would that the greatest of all novelists could return to us for a week. For it would take Dickens in his prime to do full justice to President Trump’s state visit to Britain this week.

Featured

Area 45: What’s Next For North Korea With Thomas Henriksen

interview with Thomas H. Henriksenvia Area 45
Friday, May 31, 2019

Will Kim Jong-un ever give up his nuclear ambitions or allow economic reforms into North Korea?

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Tired, Boring—And Dangerous—Celebrity Death Wishing

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, June 2, 2019

Recently, New York writer Fran Lebowitz told Bill Maher on his HBO program that the U.S. government should turn President Donald Trump “over to the Saudis, his buddies—the same Saudis who got rid of that reporter.”

Analysis and Commentary

The White House Hasn't Gone To The Dogs, Which Doesn't Seem To Dog This President

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Monday, June 3, 2019

Years after a Democratic president supposedly observed that a dog was the only true friend to be found in the nation’s capital (like many a Mark Twain quote, we don’t know if Harry Truman actually said the words), it would be seem that a few Democratic presidential candidates see a canine as their ticket to the Oval Office.

Analysis and Commentary

The Good, The Bad And The Ugly In The Attorney General’s CBS Interview

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Sunday, June 2, 2019

Jan Crawford’s extraordinary CBS interview with Attorney General William Barr was released on Friday, May 31. In it Barr said some good things about why his investigation of the Trump campaign investigation is needed. He also said some bad things about his attitude toward his investigation that reveal the depressingly ugly state of U.S. intelligence and law enforcement institutions.

Analysis and Commentary

Digital Currencies And Fast Payment Systems

by Darrell Duffievia Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Saturday, June 1, 2019

I examine monetary policy implications and business strategy concerns related to the introduction of digital currencies and faster payment systems. Key issues include financial inclusion, payment system efficiency, control by central banks of monetary policy transmission, privacy and anti-monetary laundering, and competition for banking services.

Analysis and Commentary

Alain Bertaud On Cities, Planning, And Order Without Design

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, June 3, 2019

Urbanist and author Alain Bertaud of NYU talks about his book Order without Design with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Bertaud explores the role of zoning and planning alongside the emergent factors that affect the growth of cities. He emphasizes the importance of cities as places for people to work and looks at how preferences and choices shape cities. Bertaud also reflects upon the differing perspectives of urban planners and economists.

Analysis and Commentary

What Explains Gains In Miami-Dade County Schools?

by Paul E. Petersonvia The Education Exchange
Monday, June 3, 2019

In the most recent ratings put out by the state of Florida, Miami-Dade County Public Schools earned an "A" designation and had no "F" rated schools, unusual achievements for a large urban district. Ron Matus, Director of Policy and Public Affairs at Step Up For Students, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss some factors behind the school district's success: dynamic and stable leadership, an understanding of how to intervene in and support the most struggling schools, and many different options for families if they are not satisfied.

Analysis and Commentary

E-Verify's Perverse Effects

by David R. Henderson quoting John H. Cochrane via EconLog
Sunday, June 2, 2019

Last week, President Trump announced that his immigration plan would not mandate that employers use E-Verify, the employment verification system that checks new employees against government databases. While the president felt it was too “tough” on illegal workers, he is wrong. Nearly all illegal workers passed the system last year. In reality, E-Verify is tough on legal workers who have had nearly 760,000 jobs held up by the system since 2006.

Analysis and Commentary

Joe Newhouse's Failure Of Omission

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, May 31, 2019

In his excellent analysis of health care costs, Alex Tabarrok refers to a widely touted finding by health economist Joseph P. Newhouse that the main driver of increases in health care costs has been increased technology. Alex links to this article by Newhouse, but the earlier Newhouse article that received so much attention was his “Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?” Journal of Economic Perspectives (Summer 1992 ): 3-21 .

Analysis and Commentary

Bio Of William Nordhaus Is On Line

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, May 31, 2019

Starting in the 1970s, Nordhaus constructed increasingly comprehensive models of the interaction between the economy and additions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, along with its effects on global warming. Economists use these models, along with assumptions about various magnitudes, to compute the “social cost of carbon” (SCC). The idea is that past a certain point, additions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere heat the earth and thus create a global negative externality. The SCC is the net cost that using that additional carbon imposes on society.

Interviews
Jonathan Rodden is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a pr
Interviews

Jonathan Rodden: A Growing Rural-Urban Divide Has Led To The Political Underrepresentation Of People Living In Cities, Stanford Political Scientist Finds

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia Stanford News
Monday, June 3, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden talks about the geographic divide, which pits Democratic voters living mostly in cities against Republican voters living mostly in exurban and rural areas; and the impact on representation and policymaking.

Interviews

Bill Whalen On Impeachment, California Politics, And 2020

interview with Bill Whalenvia The Federalist
Friday, May 31, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses Robert Mueller’s press conference this week and how the Democrats are leaning into impeachment. He also talks about the political landscape in California and the decline of the Golden State’s Republicans.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: 2020 Democrat Hopefuls Booed At California Convention For Criticizing Socialism, 'Medicare For All'

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Fox News
Monday, June 3, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses whether moderate Democrats should be concerned by the reception given to John Hickenlooper and John Delaney.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli On The Education Gadfly Show: Rural Schools And The Urban Bleed

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the struggles of rural areas to hold on to their brightest residents.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: 'This Week' Roundtable: Next Phase Of Democratic Primary, Impeachment Debate, Tariff Battles

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, June 2, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen joins a panel discussion concerning the Democratic primary and which candidates they think will make it to the June debate stage, as well as impeachment, tariffs, and much more.

In the News
George Shultz
In the News

Secretary George Shultz: Thinking About The Future

featuring George P. Shultzvia Commonwealth Club
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

George P. Shultz sits down for a conversation with Dr. Gloria Duffy at the San Francisco Marines’ Memorial Theatre on Tuesday, June 4 at 12:00 PM.

In the News

How To Fix Congress—And Why: A Conversation With Rep. Mike Gallagher

mentioning Michael McFaul, Larry Diamond, Alex Stamos, Andrew Grotto, Toomas Hendrik Ilvesvia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

The Hoover Institution hosts "How to Fix Congress—And Why: A Conversation with Rep. Mike Gallagher" on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT.

In the News

The Supreme Court Should Take The Love Terminal Takings Case

quoting Richard A. Epsteinvia Reason
Friday, May 31, 2019

A lower court decision the Supreme Court is currently considering reviewing has important - and dangerous - implications for property rights.

In the News

A Lawyer Explains How The Persecution Of Julian Assange Could Spectacularly Backfire

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The Canary
Saturday, June 1, 2019

A lawyer who specialises in hacking and information security may have provided an argument as to why the US extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should not proceed. A legal expert has forensically destroyed the latest charges against Assange. Meanwhile, award-winning journalist Robert Fisk and former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger argue why the US prosecution of Assange should set off alarm bells everywhere.

In the News

Assault On America, Day 149: Distraught Dems Out Of Options As Impeachment Dreams Dwindle

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Conservative HQ
Friday, May 31, 2019

“Go ahead, make my day.” It’s the line Clint Eastwood made famous while staring down the barrel of his Smith and Wesson .44 Magnum in the early 80s Dirty Harry classic “Sudden Impact”. Toss out the saying and pretty much everyone knows exactly what you’re referring to.

In the News

California’s Education Funding Perpetuates Racial And Poverty Divide

quoting Eric Hanushekvia The Mercury News
Friday, May 31, 2019

Education is the great equalizer, yet its inequitable distribution of money and resources is horrific. The way schools are funded in California perpetuates a racial and poverty divide. As a beginning teacher at Santa Clara County’s Juvenile Hall, I was taken aback by the fact that 70 percent of incarcerated youth read at three or more years below grade level. Most of my students could not read a typical restaurant menu, let alone a novel.

In the News

Charter School Promoters Criticize and Complain About Charter Schools While Pushing For More Charter Schools

quoting Chester E. Finn Jr.via Dissident Voice
Saturday, June 1, 2019

The narrow aim of maximizing profit as fast as possible compels owners of capital to say and do whatever they have to to get richer, no matter how irrational and contradictory, and no matter the cost to society and the environment. Such an aim is irresponsible and outdated, and needs to be replaced by a human-centered aim that recognizes the need for a modern economy controlled by the working class and people themselves.

In the News

A Reform Agenda For Modi 2.0

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Hindu Business Line
Sunday, June 2, 2019

Thirteen economists offer non-partisan, common-sense prescriptions for policy action across various sectors Earlier this week, barely days after Narendra Modi led the BJP to a stunning re-election triumph and the new Ministry took charge, a trickle of official data confirmed the bad economic news that everyone but the government had known about for months.

In the News

Unintended Consequences

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia Proshare Nigeria Limited
Saturday, June 1, 2019

The law of unintended consequences, often cited but rarely defined, is that actions of people—and especially of government—always have effects that are unanticipated or unintended. Economists and other social scientists have heeded its power for centuries; for just as long, politicians and popular opinion have largely ignored it.

In the News

Leaders Whose Actions Shock Markets Risk Eroding Public Trust In Policy Makers

quoting Steven J. Davisvia The Business Times
Saturday, June 1, 2019

Political announcements, such as Donald Trump's shock move to slap tariffs on Mexico, have an impact on monetary policy decisions and could undermine trust in policy makers, said economists and academics on Friday. This erosion of trust could spill over into other areas, diminishing the influence that the US monetary policy has on the global economy, they added. They were speaking to the media on the sidelines of the 6th Asian Monetary Policy Forum held in Singapore.

In the News

No Catastrophe

quoting Bruce Thorntonvia Carolina Coast Online
Friday, May 31, 2019

While climate change is a political loser, as we noted in the May 18 Australian election when the Liberal-National Coalition, stressing economic growth, tax cuts and support for Australia’s energy producers, united conservatives and tossed out the opposition center-left Labor Party, climate change activists are now resorting to a change in semantics to try and curry favor.

In the News

Singapore Hosts 6th Asian Monetary Policy Forum

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Xinhuanet (China)
Friday, May 31, 2019

The Sixth Asian Monetary Policy Forum (AMPF), co-organized and funded by the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the National University of Singapore Business School and the Monetary Authority of Singapore, convened here on Friday.

In the News

A Brief History Of The Theory Trump And Barr Use To Resist Congressional Oversight

quoting John Yoovia History News Network
Sunday, June 2, 2019

The unitary theory of the presidency may be reaching its logical conclusion under President Donald J. Trump. That theory, which is referred to as the unitary executive, holds that presidents have broad, close to unlimited, powers over the executive branch. At its extreme, the theory holds that the president cannot be checked “by Congress or the Courts, especially in critical realms of authority,” as John P. MacKenzie wrote in his book Absolute Power.

Bank Vault
In the News

Federal Reserve Bank Of New York Issues Remarks At Conference Celebrating 50th Anniversary Of Journal Of Money, Credit And Banking

mentioning John B. Taylorvia Advisor News
Saturday, June 1, 2019

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York issued the following remarks by President and CEO John C. Williams at the conference celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking: "John Maynard Keynes quipped, "Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist." I wonder whether Keynes would see this as a feature rather than a bug in light of his enduring influence on the profession more than 70 years after his death.

In the News

Privacy And Civil Liberties Board Considers Three Ways For Congress To Address Controversial Surveillance Program

quoting Jamil Jaffervia BroadbandBreakfast.com
Saturday, June 1, 2019

Congress needs a plan for how to proceed when certain provisions of the USA FREEDOM Act, including the controversial call detail records program, expires in December, said speakers at a public forum held by members of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board on Friday.

In the News

Stronger Leadership, Stronger Ties

mentioning Condoleezza Ricevia Economic Times (India)
Friday, May 31, 2019

Americans were indeed surprised by the size of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s mandate. But rattled they are not. It’s true that US President Donald Trump likes strong leaders. But cheerleading is unusual.

In the News

The Sixth Asian Monetary Policy Forum Discusses Global Reserve And Digital Currencies

mentioning Steven J. Davisvia Monetary Authority of Singapore
Friday, May 31, 2019

The Asian Monetary Policy Forum (AMPF) convenes today for the sixth consecutive year. The highlights of the Forum include presentations and discussions on the dominant role of the US dollar and its implications for monetary policy, as well as challenges posed by digital currencies.