Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Carbon Tax

by John H. Cochrane mentioning George P. Shultzvia Grumpy Economist
Friday, November 9, 2018

"The carbon tax is dead; long live the carbon tax" is the headline of Tyler Cowen's Bloomberg column on the failed (again) Washington State carbon tax. And rather decisively, per the picture on the left. "Maybe its failure on the ballot in Washington state will inspire economists to come up with better arguments" challenges the subhead. I can't resist.

Featured

States Are Experimenting With Voting Systems — Some Work Better Than Others

by David Davenportvia Washington Examiner
Monday, November 12, 2018

Although the 2018 elections were held last week, the madness continues. As it was in the 2000 presidential election, Florida is once again embroiled in recounts for both its gubernatorial and Senate races, accompanied by allegations of lost and stolen ballots and lawsuits.

Featured

Mr. President, Don’t Fire Mueller – It Will Hurt You And America

by Robert J. Delahunty, John Yoovia Fox News
Saturday, November 10, 2018

Now that he’s fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions, there’s speculation that President Trump will ask his newly appointed acting attorney general to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller in order to end Mueller’s probe of Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election and possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.

Featured

Progressive Politics Are Not Really Progressive

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, November 11, 2018

Some progressives lamented the apparent defeat of radical progressive African-American candidates such as gubernatorial nominees Stacey Abrams of Georgia and Florida’s Andrew Gillum by blaming allegedly treasonous white women. Apparently white women did not vote sufficiently en bloc in accordance with approved notions of identity politics tribalism.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Mass Migration And The Failure Of Civilizational Nerve

by Bruce Thorntonvia Front Page Magazine
Monday, November 12, 2018

The people spoke on election day, and they decided that they like divided government, handing the House to the Democrats and strengthening the Republican hold on the Senate. This means that many pressing issues needing attention will languish in political limbo for another two years, even as the nation’s dysfunctions worsen. One of the longest and more serious is our broken immigration system, at a time when mass movements of peoples into Europe and the U.S. threaten the identity and core principles of Western Civilization.

Analysis and Commentary

Taking The Law Into Your Own Handheld

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, November 11, 2018

Joshua Browder is an ambitious young man. A 21-year-old computer-science senior at Stanford, he aims to make lawyers obsolete, at least for humdrum troubles such as parking tickets, disputes with landlords, and small claims for which legal fees would wipe out much of the compensation.

Analysis and Commentary

One Way To View The Midterm Results: A Market Correction

by Bill Whalenvia Forbes
Friday, November 9, 2018

Political junkies weren’t the only ones who had a busy week. Consider what America’s investor class experienced. On Monday, not quite knowing what the following day would bring, the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 200 points – a nice change from a volatile October.

Analysis and Commentary

Julia Belluz On Epidemiology, Nutrition, And Metabolism

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, November 12, 2018

Science writer Julia Belluz of Vox.com talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of epidemiology, nutrition, and the relationship between obesity and metabolism.

Analysis and Commentary

U.S. Government Passivity In Cyber Space

by Bing West via Military History in the News
Friday, November 9, 2018

In 2015, President Obama held a press conference with Chinese President Xi Jinping. “I indicated that it [cyber theft] has to stop.” Both governments agreed not to engage in or support online theft of intellectual property.

Analysis and Commentary

Good News On Iranian Sanctions

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, November 9, 2018

In anticipation of the US sanctions against Iranian oil exports, which were reimposed by the Trump Administration on Monday (along with additional sanctions on everything from Iranian shipping to banking and insurance), oil tankers bearing the Iranian flag have embraced a stealthy approach to keeping the oil flowing: They’re ‘ghosting’ international trackers by turning off their transponders, rendering the ships impossible to track by anything aside from visual cues.

Analysis and Commentary

You Didn't Build That

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, November 9, 2018

When former President Obama was running for re-election in 2012, he made his famous “You Didn’t Build That” speech in Roanoke, Virginia. I blogged about it back in August 2012 and got almost a record number of comments.

Interviews
Interviews

Amit Seru: Best Business Schools Broadcast From Stanford (20:40)

interview with Amit Seru via Bloomberg
Friday, November 9, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Amit Seru discusses financial regulation.

Interviews

Crossing Lines With Lanhee Chen: A Pollster, A Journo, And Why We Can’t Just Get Along

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Ricochet
Friday, November 9, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen recaps the midterm elections and talks about how Republicans should address health care reform going forward.

In the News
In the News

India Can’t Work From The Centre, Says Raghuram Rajan

featuring Raghuram Rajanvia Live Mint
Saturday, November 10, 2018

India works when you have many people taking up the burden. And today the central government is excessively centralised: Former RBI governor Raghuram Rajan.

In the News

John Yoo: Trump's Appointment Of Whitaker 'Unconstitutional'

featuring John Yoovia NewsMax
Friday, November 9, 2018

President Donald Trump’s appointment of attorney general Jeff Sessions’ chief of staff Matthew Whitaker has drawn criticism from several conservative legal experts, including law professor and former Justice Department staffer John Yoo.

In the News

From Cold War To Hot Peace: Explaining Our New Conflict With Russia

featuring Michael McFaulvia University News (University of Missouri-Kansas City)
Monday, November 12, 2018

In 2008, when Michael McFaul was asked to leave his perch at Stanford and join an unlikely presidential campaign, he had no idea that he would find himself at the beating heart of one of today’s most contentious and consequential international relationships.

In the News

Rubio On Claim Dems Are Trying To Change Election Results

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Fox News
Friday, November 9, 2018

Victor Davis Hanson, one of the deepest thinkers, respected thinkers out there. He's a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institute and he joins us right now.

In the News

Federal Budget: Out Of Control Number 2

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Seeking Alpha
Friday, November 9, 2018

More and more people seem to be getting concerned about the lack of fiscal discipline now being exhibited by the US government.

In the News

What Does History Tell Us About 2018?

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia The Washington Free Beacon
Friday, November 9, 2018

The lesson of 2018 is that the political class is addicted to drawing lessons. Every two years, after the ballots are counted and the winners declared, our reporters, pundits, officials, activists, and analysts turn immediately to the next election. What do these results portend? Will Trump be reelected? Will the suburbs stay Democratic? 

In the News

Oprah And Obama Transcend Race; Or So We Thought

quoting Shelby Steelevia Townhall
Sunday, November 11, 2018

The midterms left us with a lot of things to think about. One of the most mind-numbing was when Oprah and Obama made it pretty clear that they believe America still oppresses black people. “All of us may have been created equal,” a preachy Oprah said at her Stacey Abrams rally. “But if ya woke! If you woke; if you woke just-a lil’ bit – you got sense enough to know that everybody’s not treated equally.

In the News

The Trade War With China And The Problem With Intellectual Property Rights

quoting Martin Feldsteinvia Forbes
Sunday, November 11, 2018

Human development is not determined by the mechanics of Darwinian evolution, wrote the French philosopher Henri Bergson, but by our own creative impulses. The advent of farming, industrial manufacturing, the scientific method, digital technology — these have shaped modern life most.

In the News

100 Years On, The 'Hello Girls' Are Recognized For World War I Heroics

quoting Elizabeth Cobbsvia KOSU
Friday, November 9, 2018

In a rehearsal space near New York's Times Square, the cast is preparing for the opening of a musical, The Hello Girls, that's been a century in the making. "Very few people have heard this story," said Cara Reichel, director of the production that premieres off-Broadway on Nov. 13, two days after the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.

In the News

Guest Speakers For California Melon Research Symposium Announced

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Fresh Plaza
Monday, November 12, 2018

The California Melon Research Board is pleased to announce their list of guest speakers for the 2019 Melon Research Symposium, to be held on Thursday, January 10, 2019 in San Diego California at the Gaslamp Marriott Quarter Hotel. Headlining the Symposium is special guest speaker, Victor Davis Hanson, renowned professor, author, editorialist and Central Valley farmer.

In the News

2 Years Of Demonetisation: What Renowned Economists Said On Note Ban

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia CNBC
Friday, November 9, 2018

On the second anniversary of demonetisation, country is still discussing the success or failure of the note ban. On November 8, 2016, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a ban on then in use Rs 1,000 and Rs 500 denomination bank notes with immediate effect.

In the News

A Thoroughly Average Midterm

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia National Review
Saturday, November 10, 2018

Tuesday’s elections went about as historical precedent suggested they would. Reading much into them beyond that is a fool’s errand.

In the News

Midterm Postmortem: Was The Election A Repudiation of Ed Reform? Or Just a Sign That It’s Going ‘Under the Radar’?

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia The 74 Million
Friday, November 9, 2018

Education reform, at least its most contentious elements, didn’t have a great night Tuesday. In Arizona, nearly two-thirds of voters rejected a bid by lawmakers to provide education savings accounts to all students.