Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Three Attributes Of A Sustainable Open And Stable Global Order

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Sunday, October 14, 2018

The IMF/World Bank meetings were held in Bali last week. In addition to the many good beaches there were many good panels including one I was on with Mark Carney and Agustin Carstens. It was organized by the Group of Thirty, led by Jacob Frenkel and Tharman Shanmugaratnam, and focused on “Sustaining an Open and Stable Global Order.”

Featured

Edward Lazear On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Edward Paul Lazearvia The John Batchelor Show
Saturday, October 13, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Ed Lazear discusses his Wall Street Journal article "America’s Economy Isn’t Overheating."

Featured

To Curb Climate Change, Tax Carbon—Then Give Americans The Money

by George P. Shultz, Ted Halsteadvia Wired
Friday, October 12, 2018

Most voters want the government to limit carbon emissions, but at a time when half of all Americans own less than $500 in savings, climate ranks low on their priority list. Through our proposal, the Baker-Schultz Carbon Dividends Plan, the United States can address economic insecurity and climate risk at the same time. In essence, the plan divvies out cash to Americans in support of a low-carbon future. And it has the backing of Big Oil.

Featured

Who And What Threaten The Constitution?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Donald Trump on occasion can talk recklessly. He is certainly trying to “fundamentally transform” the United States in exactly the opposite direction from which Barack Obama promised to do the same sort of massive recalibration. According to polls (such as they are), half the country fears Trump. The media despises him. Yet Trump poses no threat to the U.S. Constitution. Those who since 2016 have tried to destroy his candidacy and then his presidency most certainly do.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

What's Wrong With Government-Run Healthcare?

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Prager U
Monday, October 15, 2018

If you get sick or suffer a serious injury, you not only want medical care, you want quality medical care. What’s the best way to get it? Through a government-run program like Medicare for All or through our current free market system? Stanford policy expert Lanhee Chen has the answer in this video from Prager University. Get informed. After all, this is your health we’re talking about.

Analysis and Commentary

John Gray On The Seven Kinds Of Atheism

by Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, October 15, 2018

Philosopher and author John Gray talks about his latest book, Seven Types of Atheism, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gray argues that progress is an illusion and that most atheisms inherit, unknowingly, a religious belief in progress that is not justified. While Gray concedes that technological know-how and scientific knowledge improve over time, he argues that morality and political systems are cyclical and that there is no reason to be optimistic about the future.

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: Is This Discrimination?

by Paul E. Peterson with Adam J. Whitevia The Education Exchange
Monday, October 15, 2018

When a school district's discipline policy has a disparate impact on African American students, is that racial discrimination? How about when an elite university uses affirmative action to increase the diversity of its student body? Adam White, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, and director of the Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss the legal issues involved.

Analysis and Commentary

Jaworski Road Map To Be Mostly Unsealed

by Stephen Bates, Jack Goldsmith, Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, October 15, 2018

One month ago, the three of us filed a petition in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for the release of the so-called “Watergate Road Map”—one of the last great still-secret Watergate documents. Last week, Chief Judge Beryl Howell, acting in a separate case, ordered the document’s release. The move, as Josh Gerstein notes in this Politico story, appears to have been prompted by our petition, on which we have been represented by the folks at Protect Democracy. 

Analysis and Commentary

Rubin And Weinstein On The Intellectual Dark Web

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Friday, October 12, 2018

Arnold Kling’s post this morning on a conversation between Dave Rubin and Eric Weinstein sounded interesting. I have never before watched a whole 2-hour interview, but I started early this morning and watched most of it before going to work. It’s interesting throughout. I realized that although Weinstein seems to be famous, I had only vaguely heard of him and didn’t know what the big deal was.

Analysis and Commentary

Jenkins On Trumps Ducking Taxes

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Sunday, October 14, 2018

In one way excruciatingly detailed by the Times, however, Mr. Trump and his sire [Fred Trump] are nothing new under the sun. Nobody in their right mind from the compulsive accumulator class pays the punitive federal estate tax. From an early age, such people make sure their lifetime achievements are not sucked up and splattered away in 15 seconds of federal spending. 

Interviews
Federal Reserve
Interviews

Stanford's John Taylor Says Trump's Fed Barbs Add To Debate

interview with John B. Taylorvia Bloomberg
Friday, October 12, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow John Taylor discusses trade and plays down concerns that President Donald Trump’s criticism of the US central bank will undermine the institution’s independence.

Interviews

Jonathan Rodden: What Comes Next In The Fight Against Partisan Gerrymandering

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia The Washington Post
Saturday, October 13, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden discusses redistricting and the midterm elections.

Interviews

Samuel Tadros On The John Batchelor Show (Part 1)

interview with Samuel Tadrosvia The John Batchelor Show
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Samuel Tadros provides a clear understanding of Copts—the native Egyptian Christians—and their crisis of modernity in conjunction with the overall developments in Egypt as it faced its own struggles with modernity.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: Saudi Crown Prince 'Like An Early Putin'

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Yahoo
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen discusses the disappearance of Saudi critic and journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Interviews

Samuel Tadros On The John Batchelor Show (Part 2)

interview with Samuel Tadrosvia The John Batchelor Show
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Samuel Tadros provides a clear understanding of Copts—the native Egyptian Christians—and their crisis of modernity in conjunction with the overall developments in Egypt as it faced its own struggles with modernity.

In the News
In the News

Fox News Has Unveiled The Programming Lineup For Its Streaming Service

mentioning Peter M. Robinson, Hoover Institutionvia Cinema Blend
Saturday, October 13, 2018

Fox News Channel has released the programming lineup for its upcoming streaming service this fall and given a glimpse at its upcoming documentaries, investigative series, and patriotic specials viewers of the news network are sure to appreciate. The network has teased a healthy amount of programming that will appear on the service ahead of its release, which includes programming from Fox News personalities exclusive to Fox Nation.

In the News

Crossing Lines With Lanhee Chen

featuring Lanhee J. Chenvia Ricochet
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Introducing the Crossing Lines podcast, hosted by Lanhee Chen. This podcast will cross the line between politics and policy; we’ll talk about what it takes to get campaigns across the line to a successful outcome; we need to cross some lines and boundaries to fix our politics.

Federal Reserve
In the News

Trump, Inflation, And The Fed

quoting Edward Paul Lazearvia The Weekly Standard
Saturday, October 13, 2018

Donald Trump wants fewer and later. Jay Powell, chairman of the Fed, more and sooner. He is confident that his plan is what the booming economy needs: raise the Fed’s benchmark interest rate from its current range of 2 percent to 2.25 percent by a quarter of a point in December, and by similar amounts three times during 2019. Those increases would bring the Fed Funds rate to about 3.00 percent, which the Fed considers the neutral rate that would keep the economy growing at a non-inflationary rate.

In the News

Americans Say Their Politics Don’t Define Them. But It’s Complicated.

quoting Morris P. Fiorinavia The New York Times
Friday, October 12, 2018

We are all various things at once — maybe a mother, a Southerner, a millennial and a member of the middle class. Or perhaps your Twitter bio introduces you as a husband, a Texan and an engineer. In an era of acrid partisanship, how do political beliefs figure into these identities? To understand this, we surveyed Americans, asking 2,204 of them this question in a national poll conducted by Morning Consult.

In the News

Thomas Sowell Quotations On The ‘Vision Of The Political Left’

quoting Thomas Sowellvia AEI
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Here are 15 quotations from Thomas Sowell, the master of “idea density,” on one of his favorite topics — the “vision of the political left” and the many defects, deficiencies and imperfections of that flawed vision.

In the News

The Robust Economy Has Hidden The Next Crisis

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia The Washington Post
Friday, October 12, 2018

In the United States, recovery from the financial crisis a decade ago has continued on as one of the longest economic expansions in American history. Unemployment is at a 50-year low. Fueled by this momentum, while ignoring the intense political disruptions of the past two years, the stock market soared to new heights — until the big plunge this week following an earlier slide in February.

In the News

Warsh: This Is A Key Moment For The U.S. Economy

quoting Kevin Warshvia The Street
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Despite the October stocks selloff, U.S. economic growth is still thriving in several areas. In the second quarter, GDP increased to 4.2 percent and consumer spending and corporate profits were up. In September, jobless claims fell to their lowest levels in decades. Still, should we have seen the stock market correction coming? And will it manifest itself in other areas, like jobs and GDP?

In the News

From In-N-Out To The County Fair: Republican John Cox Tries To Make A Name In California

quoting Bill Whalenvia The New York Times
Saturday, October 13, 2018

John Cox, the Republican businessman running for governor of California, and his small entourage breezed through the doors of an In-N-Out Burger in Ventura County the other day. Mr. Cox introduced himself to a couple at a corner table eating burgers, mentioning how he has been rising in some polls.

In the News

Lies Of Affirmative Action At Harvard

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Powerline
Sunday, October 14, 2018

Writing in the Claremont Review of Books, Thomas Sowell commented: “Sander and Taylor have written an outstanding book that deserves to be read and pondered in many places for many years. They have performed a major service for all those who have an open mind on affirmative action, however modest the number of such people may be—and a still more important service for those who think that black students on campus should be there to advance their own education and lives, not to serve in a role much like that of movie extras, whose presence enhances the scene for others.”

In the News

RBI’s Acharya Bats For Persisting With Prompt Corrective Action Framework

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Bloomberg Quint
Friday, October 12, 2018

Reserve Bank of India Deputy Governor Viral Acharya on Friday made a strong argument in favour of the regulator’s prompt corrective action framework, which has drawn flack from many quarters including the government.