Hoover Daily Report
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Education

featuring Eric Hanushek, Margaret (Macke) Raymond, Russell Roberts, Paul E. Peterson, Chester E. Finn Jr., Tom Churchvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Education policy is complicated in the United States because of our federalist system. The federal government’s role in education is more advisory than operational. It provides a lot of guidance on the standards and goals for students, but allows states and local governments the flexibility to achieve them with varying methods. The federal government is in a position to know what we need in order to be competitive internationally. It can also be valuable in compensating students who need extra help. 

Featured

Mueller Investigation Was Driven By Pious Hypocrisy

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s two-year, $30 million, 448-page report did not find collusion between Donald Trump and Russia. Despite compiling private allegations of loud and obnoxious Trump behavior, Mueller also concluded that there was not any actionable case of obstruction of justice by the president. It would have been hard in any case to find that Trump obstructed Mueller’s investigation of an alleged crime.

Featured

Lee Ohanian On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Lee Ohanianvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lee Ohanian discusses his California On Your Mind article "The Extremely Bad Economics Of Single-Payer Healthcare For California."

Featured

Britain’s Huawei Gamble Is Sure To Anger Donald Trump

by Michael R. Auslinvia The Spectator
Thursday, April 25, 2019

Just hours after Donald Trump’s long-delayed state visit to Britain was finally confirmed, reports surfaced that Theresa May and her National Security Council have decided to let Chinese telecommunications company Huawei participate in building Britain’s 5G network. The decision is a direct slap in the face to Washington’s attempts to isolate Huawei, which itself is part of a larger campaign to aggressively counter Beijing’s pervasive and endemic cyberespionage.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Federal Education R & D: A Brief, Opinionated History (Part II)

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

To be sure, Uncle Sam also puts some money into education research through other agencies, especially the National Science Foundation; other parts of the Department of Education support studies and innovations related to their own missions; and a dozen private foundations view education research as an important component—in a few cases the lead item—in their own spending.

Analysis and Commentary

Earth (Day) To Governor Newsom: Why Didn’t You Ban Fracking?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, April 25, 2019

Some Californians give Earth Day a symbolic nod—picking up litter on a beach, riding a bicycle to work to spare the air.

Analysis and Commentary

The Lawfare Podcast: Michael Anton Defends Trump's Foreign Policy

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith interviews Michael Anton, former Trump administration national security official and a research fellow at Hillsdale College, concerning the new article and the philosophy behind Trump's foreign policy, particularly with respect to liberal internationalism and international institutions.

Analysis and Commentary

On Risk Mitigation And Huawei: A Response

by Herbert Linvia Lawfare
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Today, Lawfare published an article by Alexei Bulazel, Sophia d’Antoine, Perri Adams and Dave Aitel on “The Risks of Huawei Risk Mitigation” that seemingly disagrees with an earlier piece of mine on the topic. But apart from a bit of snark about my use of the confidentiality-integrity-availability (CIA) triad as a pillar of the security discussion and the definition of risk mitigation, I don’t disagree with anything in their piece and endorse almost all of it.

Analysis and Commentary

You Might Be Surprised Which States Prioritize Higher Teacher Salaries

by Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

It’s one of the great conundrums of American public education: Even when calculated in constant dollars, and even after the Great Recession, the U.S. is spending dramatically more per pupil than in decades past, yet teacher salaries have barely kept pace with inflation. This raises several key questions: Where is the money going, if not into salaries? And how much could we pay teachers if we prioritized higher salaries instead? To be clear, I don’t have all the answers. But I do have a fresh look at the data.

Interviews
Interviews

Paul Gregory On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Paul R. Gregoryvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Paul Gregory discusses his Hill article "Peaceful Ukrainian election is a win for democracy."

In the News
In the News

Former RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan Raises Concerns About AI & Automation Taking Away Skilled Jobs

featuring Raghuram Rajanvia Analytics India Magazine
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Rajan, who served as the 23rd RBI Governor from 2013-2016, was delivering the keynote address at 2019 ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development at the UN Headquarters in New York, where he said that protectionism alone wouldn’t save jobs in the wake of automation and that it cannot act as a shield against imminent job losses at the hands of these emerging technologies.

In the News

More on the Mueller Investigations

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia NewsMax
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

All serious observers can (and do) agree that there is no chance of removing this president from office by impeachment.

In the News

Elizabeth Warren’s Tuition Plan Is Too Good To Be True

quoting Thomas Sowellvia The Inquirer
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Economist Thomas Sowell once said that the first lesson of economics is that nothing is free, and that the first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics. Elizabeth Warren, taking the first lesson of politics to heart, proposed this week forgiving student loan debts and making public universities “free.”

In the News

The Fed Fights A New Bank It Fears. The Startup Sees Nothing To Worry About

quoting John H. Cochrane via Investing
Thursday, April 25, 2019

The Federal Reserve is trying to kill a fledgling bank before the newfangled business takes root, arguing it’s a dangerous idea. The nascent company says there’s no reason to fret about its plan to give big investors access to the central bank’s highest interest rates.

In the News

Media Ethics In Professional Journalism: Avocation And Professional Standards (Part II) – Essay

quoting William Damonvia Eurasia Review
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Nowadays, constituent part of professional standards are truth, honesty (objectivity), dispassionate, adequate relations with the sources of information, respect towards persons who are the subject of information, elimination of any kind of discrimination and the responsibility of journalists.

In the News

Don't Let Trump Hatred Thwart The School Choice Movement

quoting Thomas Sowellvia Hermann Herald
Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The Detroit school board recently voted 6-to-1 to consider removing Dr. Ben Carson‘s name from one of its high schools. Carson, a former Detroit student and former head of pediatric neurology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, pioneered several groundbreaking neurosurgical procedures. He now serves as President Donald Trump‘s secretary of housing and urban development. But one school board member said Carson‘s name on the school is comparable to “having Trump‘s name on our school in blackface.”