Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Greece Finds New Footing As A Player On The World Stage

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

After Greece temporarily hosted a pair of U.S. military drones, Greek Defense Minister Panagiotis Kammenos said last fall that, “It’s very important for Greece that the United States deploy military assets in Greece on a more permanent base.”

Featured

Lasting Lessons From The Beaches Of Normandy

by Col Timothy "Papa" Murphy, Lt Col Kevin Childsvia The Hill
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Late in the evening on June 5, 1944, U.K. Prime Minister Winston Churchill ominously told his wife before they went to sleep, “Do you realize that by the time you wake up in the morning twenty thousand men may have been killed?”

Featured

The Education-Health Care Perplex

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

As I observe health care rise to the top of the policy debates foreshadowing the 2020 election—seems to be second only to Donald Trump among the twenty-three Democrats now seeking the Oval Office—as K–12 education sinks lower on the policy horizon (such that several observers declare ed-reform a thing of the past), I’m struck by how much these two vast and troubled domains have in common, as do efforts to change them.

Featured

Connecting Silicon Valley And The US Department Of Defense

Wednesday, June 5, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Cultivating the often rocky relationship between Silicon Valley and the US Department of Defense was the topic of a recent Hoover Institution symposium. The May 22-23 “Tech Track II Symposium: Restoring Essential Bonds Between the Department of Defense and the Silicon Valley” brought together dozens of Hoover scholars, entrepreneurs and defense experts to discuss issues inherent to their relationships. It was a unique moment for both communities, and optimism and positive talk abounded while real challenges were candidly acknowledged.

News
In the NewsIn the NewsFeatured

The Legacy Of Tiananmen Square At 30

Thursday, June 6, 2019
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "The Legacy of Tiananmen Square at 30" on Thursday, June 6, 2019 from 12:00 PM to 1:15 PM EDT.

Event
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Sacramento’s Attitude Toward Santa Cruz: The Opposite Of “Fear And Loathing"

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, June 6, 2019

For some American cities, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery—New York City, for example, wanting to to be in the same sentence as Paris and London as cultured, cosmopolitan hubs for world travel and commerce.

Analysis and Commentary

D-Day At 75

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Military History in the News
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Seventy-five years ago, American, British, Canadian, and French soldiers stormed ashore on the beaches of Normandy to begin the final campaign in the liberation of Europe from Nazi tyranny. It was an operation four years in the making, ever since the withdrawal of British and French troops from Dunkirk after the disastrous battle for France left the Wehrmacht in control of Northwest Europe. The campaigns waged by the Grand Alliance—the Battle of the Atlantic, the strategic bombing offensive, the invasions of North Africa and Italy— were preludes to this decisive moment in World War II. Millions of soldiers and tens of thousands of pieces of military equipment were staged in Britain in anticipation of this venture.

Analysis and Commentary

Teacher Diversity Is Yet Another Area Where Charter Schools Excel

by Amber M. Northern, Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

As conservatives working in education, we find ourselves drawn to Chief Justice Roberts’s observation that “it is a sordid business, this divvying us up by race.” And along with Dr. King, we want to believe in a world where everyone is judged by the content of their character, not the color of the skin. As such, we tend to think that teachers should be hired based on the quality of their instruction and their fit with a school’s mission—not their race or ethnicity. So we’ve been skeptical, even uncomfortable, about efforts to “match” students and teachers based on their race.

Analysis and Commentary

Beating The Drum For Charter Schools

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Sarah Tantillo is an accomplished teacher, author, and battle-scarred veteran of the charter-school wars, particularly in New Jersey, where she taught for years at acclaimed North Star Academy and led the state charter school association. Now she has published a first-rate account of and tribute to “how the charter school idea became a national movement.” Titled Hit the Drum, it’s worth the while of everyone who wants a deeper understanding of how charters were born and grew—and prefers to read a brisk, readable, engaging account.

Analysis and Commentary

Electricity From Large Dams Does Not Count As Renewable Energy

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Anna Caballero, a Democratic state senator from a district near me in California, had a proposal that I actually agreed with. She wanted the term “renewable energy” in California law to refer to–hold on to your hat–renewable energy.

Interviews
Interviews

Secretary George Shultz: Thinking About the Future

interview with George P. Shultzvia Commonwealth Club
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow George Shultz discusses his newest book, Thinking About the Future.

Interviews

Elizabeth Cobbs: ‘The Tubman Command’ Explores Harriet Tubman’s Life As A Spy For The Union Army

interview with Elizabeth Cobbsvia WABE 90.1
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Cobbs discusses her historical novel, The Tubman Command, and talks about how the woman known as “Moses” devised one of the largest plantation raids of the Civil War.

Interviews

Michael Auslin On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses his Foreign Policy magazine article "China’s Complacent Generation."

In the News
In the News

Monetary Policy Stability, Rules Critical For Economy

Thursday, June 6, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Economist Michael D. Bordo argues in a new Hoover Institution Press book for the importance of monetary stability and monetary rules, offering theoretical, empirical, and historical perspectives to support his case.

News
In the News

Taylor’s Rule: Too High, Too Low – Where Should Interest Rates Go?

interview with John B. Taylorvia Biz News
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Taylor’s Rule is an interest rate forecasting model invented by John Taylor in the early 90s. And according to Investopedia “it’s a proposed guideline for how central banks should alter interest rates in response to changes in economic conditions.” In South Africa, the Reserve Bank’s mandate is very topical at present, which in turn sets up a discussion around interest rates. SARB’s current mandate is tailored around a targeted inflation band of 3-6%, with the repo rate currently at 6.75%. 

In the News

Three Cheers For A Two-Eyed Economist

featuring Raghuram Rajanvia The Washington Times
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Harry Truman famously remarked that he wished he could find a one-armed economist since all the ones he had to deal with were constantly weasel-wording their advice with “on the one hand” and “on the other hand.” As one who routinely had to read and try to squeeze meaning out of the verbiage of White House economic advisors as a speechwriter for presidents Nixon, Ford and Reagan, I know exactly how Truman felt.

In the News

Ahead Of The 2020 Election, Stanford Experts Urge A Concerted, National Response To Confront Foreign Interference

quoting Michael McFaul, Andrew Grotto, Alex Stamos, Larry Diamond, Herbert Lin, Toomas Hendrik Ilvesvia Stanford News
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Scholars from Stanford University put forward a comprehensive strategy for what needs to be done to protect the integrity and independence of U.S. elections, with a keen focus on the upcoming presidential campaign in 2020.

In the News

Hometown Hero

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Leroy Pond Drive on the campus of the University of Arkansas is named after a hero from World War II who first saw combat on his 27th birthday on June 6, 1944.

In the News

The US Is Missing Its Chance To Fix Our Election System Before We Vote In 2020

quoting Michael McConnellvia Raw Story
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

As 2020’s elections edge closer, recent troubling developments are casting new light on an old question—what will it take for the results to be trusted?

Green Energy
In the News

Revisiting The Old New Deal

quoting Lee Ohanianvia Washington Examiner
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

When Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her allies proposed a new stimulus package to take on climate change and income inequality, they called it the Green New Deal. Their reasoning for the economic program’s name is obvious. It pays homage to the New Deal, a bundle of transformative economic reforms captained by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during the Great Depression. Like the original New Deal, the Green New Deal includes massive government intervention in the American economy through more spending, regulation, and taxes.

In the News

Fed's Dot Plot, QE, Average Inflation: Fed Conference Takeaways

quoting John B. Taylorvia Bloomberg
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

The Federal Reserve wound up its two-day framework conference on Wednesday with little consensus on what can be done to better prepare for the next big recession.

In the News

The Cybersecurity 202: Stanford Group Calls For Major Overhaul On Election Security. Here Are Their Recommendations

quoting Michael McFaul, Alex Stamosvia The Washington Post
Thursday, June 6, 2019

A plan released this week by a Stanford University group that includes former top government and tech industry officials aims to be the equivalent of the 9/11 Commission report for election security.

In the News

Are US Households Losing The Trade War?

quoting Robert E. Hallvia Chicago Booth Review
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Over the course of 2018, the Trump administration imposed tariffs on approximately $283 billion of US imports, with rates ranging between 10 percent and 50 percent. In response, US trading partners, especially China, retaliated with tariffs averaging 16 percent on approximately $121 billion of US exports.

In the News

Russia's Ability To Manipulate Twitter? It's Far Worse Than We Previously Thought

quoting Michael McFaulvia Salon
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

A new report reveals that Russia's ability to manipulate Twitter before and during the 2016 presidential election is far worse than previously thought.

In the News

American Foreign Policy Adrift

quoting George P. Shultzvia Foreign Affairs
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

In a May 11 speech at the Claremont Institute in Beverly Hills, entitled “A Foreign Policy from the Founding,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo quoted John Quincy Adams to explain how Donald Trump’s foreign policy is grounded in a “realism” that eluded his predecessors, particularly George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Adams, then Secretary of State, wrote in 1821 that America “goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all.”

Euro Banknotes
In the News

ECB Vows To Hold Rates At Historic Lows Until At Least Early 2020

quoting Melvyn B. Kraussvia Irish Times
Thursday, June 6, 2019

The European Central Bank has said it expects to keep rates on hold at record lows until the middle of 2020 as policymakers grapple with mounting concerns about weak inflation.

In the News

Chase Says Arbitration ‘Provides Better Outcomes’ For Consumers. Nope, Say Researchers

quoting Amit Seru via The Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

JPMorgan Chase is notifying more than 40 million credit card holders that from now on they’ll have to arbitrate any disputes, forgoing the option of filing a lawsuit or joining class-action suits. Although an opt-out is possible (but difficult), this places Chase alongside many other businesses insisting arbitration is a better alternative for consumers than litigation.

Amy Zegart on American attitudes toward torture
In the News

Obama And Russian Collusion

quoting Michael McFaulvia The Washington Times
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul provided new clues recently about a controversial open-mic comment in 2012 by President Obama, widely viewed as secret collusion to limit U.S. missile defenses.

In the News

Library Presents Program On History Of Chinese Railroad Workers

mentioning Hoover Institutionvia Leominster Champion
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Join Richard Cheu on a journey of discovery as he presents the program “Debunking Myths About the Chinese Railroad Workers” on Wednesday, June 12 at 3 p.m. in the Leominster Public Library’s Community Room.