Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Unintended Consequences

by Thomas Sowellvia Creators Syndicate
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Thomas Sowell Opinion Columns - Unintended Consequences

Analysis and Commentary

Miley Cyrus and Ugly Sex

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Was the MTV performance meant to be repellent rather than enticing?

Analysis and Commentary

A Nation of Laws, Not Men

by David Davenportvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Dynamic Competition and Anti Trust Policy

by Gary S. Beckervia Becker-Posner Blog
Monday, September 2, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Now What?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)
Monday, September 2, 2013

What are the president’s strategic objectives in the present mess? Does he know? There are four general strategic options — predicated on the political fact that either the Congress will approve the operation or that the Obama administration will ignore it if it doesn’t, and that Obama is not worried about either the present absence of both public support and any militarily credible allies, and that he need not explain our primary objectives that will be made up as we go along  (e.g., punish WMD use, regime change, enhance U.S. security, help the insurgents, restore U.S. prestige, etc.) 1)  A “shot across the bow” token effort to restore credibility. Bill Clinton did something similar after the attacks on the East African embassies, and Ronald Reagan did some shelling and bombing after serial attacks on the Marines in 1983–4 and did some damage to Gaddafi in 1986. A cruise-missile-on-the-wrist would mean some launches aimed at breaking stuff and killing bad people. It would warn Assad that we could afford to do that repeatedly far more easily than Assad can afford to use WMDs again. Ostensibly it would restore the president’s redline, warn people that it is wrong to use WMDs, marginally help Assad’s opponents, and do some damage to the regime. The upside, to the extent that there is any, is that few Americans would be endangered in the short term, and the cost would be tolerable. The act, if past examples are any guide, would be of no real strategic benefit, but might offer the flummoxed Obama administration a political fig leaf. 2)  Leading-from-behind bombing. On the theory that WMDs don’t think or act, but rather the people who deploy them do, then Assad becomes the target. In this scenario, we might order a week or two of bombing and cruise-missile launches intended to destroy Syrian air power, level his military facilities, and tip the scales to the opposition, in the fashion of the Libya operation. We could probably do this for a week or two without much loss, and Iranians or their surrogates would target U.S. interests and our allies in the region. Retaliation to possible enemy retaliation, in tit-for-tat fashion, would be assumed necessary. 3) The Serbian solution. Here we would try to organize allies for a sustained bombing campaign of several weeks until Assad is killed or agrees to leave. We would have to assume that the al-Qaeda insurgents would give way to the Free Syrian Army and the latter’s dominance would be a great improvement over Assad. There are more downsides of maintaining public support and international tolerance, but again regime change is feasible. The postbellum scenario would be entirely speculative, given that the U.S. would have little, if any, influence on what follows on the ground. Libya, I think, was largely a disaster, but apparently few hold the administration culpable for the lawless chaos that now reigns in Libya, much less what was turned on us at Benghazi. 4) The whole-hog Afghanistan/Iraq operation to ensure regime change and democratic nation-building. No need to elaborate on this — given the political impossibility in the present climate.  

Analysis and Commentary

The High Cost of a Quick Syria Campaign

by Josef Joffevia Wall Street Journal Europe
Monday, September 2, 2013

What would Ike say? Barack Obama's decision to kick the Syria question over to Congress means America won't be marching to war for days or weeks yet, but even now the after effects of the president's abdication are being felt in Damascus and beyond. Certainly, Dwight D.

Analysis and Commentary

Health Savings Accounts as Antidote to Obamacare

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Bloomberg View
Monday, September 2, 2013

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act have heralded the recent slowdown in health-care spending as evidence that the law is working. Unfortunately for them,

Analysis and Commentary

Bad Reasons for Bombing Syria

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Monday, September 2, 2013

The key issues Congress needs to debate.

Analysis and Commentary

Obama Indicts Obama

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, September 1, 2013

One of the problems that Barack Obama has in mounting an attack against the Assad regime is that the gambit violates every argument Barack Obama used against the Bush administration to establish his o

Analysis and Commentary

Introducing Netflix Academy: The Best Educational Videos Available for Streaming

by Michael J. Petrillivia Education Next
Saturday, August 31, 2013

Skeptics of educational technology like to quote mid-century enthusiasts who claimed that the filmstrip was set to transform our schools.

Missiles
Analysis and Commentary

Syria is Set to Become a Fractured State Like the Former Yugoslavia

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Guardian (UK)
Saturday, August 31, 2013

Thomas H Henriksen: A US strike on Syria is as much about beating back al-Qaida affiliates as it is about Bashar al-Assad

Analysis and Commentary

On Syria, Obama Administration Disproves Obama Doctrine

by Kori Schakevia Shadow Government (Foreign Policy)
Saturday, August 31, 2013

Analysis and Commentary

What Happened to the Rule of Law?

by Jack Goldsmithvia New York Times
Saturday, August 31, 2013

The United Nations Charter has been violated more than times than it has been followed.

Interviews
Interviews

Fouad Ajami on Anderson Cooper 360

with Fouad Ajamivia Anderson Cooper 360 (CNN)
Monday, September 2, 2013

President Obama and U.S. administration officials stepped up their efforts to win congressional approval for a possible military strike in Syria. Christopher Dickey, Middle East Editor for Newsweek/The Daily Beast, Fouad Ajami, Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institute, Bill Kristol of the Week...

Interviews

Richard Epstein on the John Batchelor Show (20:41)

with Richard A. Epsteinvia John Batchelor Show
Friday, August 30, 2013

Guests: Christopher Harmer, Institute for the Study of War; Mary Anastasia O'Grady, WSJ; Richard Epstein, Hoover.

In the News
In the News

Mike Munger on Milk

with Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, September 2, 2013

Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about why milk is in the back of the grocery store. Michael Pollan and others argue that milk is in the back so that customers, who often buy...

In the News

USS Nimitz Carrier Group Sails into Red Sea in 'Prudent' Move

with Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Reuters
Monday, September 2, 2013

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The USS Nimitz aircraft carrier and four other ships in its strike group moved into the Red Sea early on Monday, U.S. defense officials said, describing the move as prudent planning

In the News

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Endangering Prosperity’

with Eric Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, Ludger Woessmannvia Washington Times
Monday, September 2, 2013

We are now 30 years beyond the landmark government report "A Nation At Risk," which warned the country that "the educational foundations of our society are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future."

In the News

Obama: The Most Imperial President

with Abraham D. Sofaervia Real Clear Politics
Sunday, September 1, 2013

So let me get this straight: In Britain, Parliament actually has a say in war? But they're the ones with a monarchy?