Hoover Daily Report
Featured
Featured

Scott Atlas On Why Competition, Not Laws, Will Make Health Care Prices Visible

by Scott W. Atlasvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

More patient control over health care spending will lead to more price visibility and lower costs. But contrary to popular belief, legislation isn’t necessary to make prices more visible in the health care system. The most compelling reason for doctors and hospitals to post their prices would be because they are competing for patients’ money.

Featured

Central Bank Independence Is Not Enough

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Four former chairs of the Fed  wrote in the Wall Street Journal today about the importance of Fed independence. I agree, but their article should have emphasized that independence is not enough.  Economic performance has been affected by large shifts between more rules-based and less rules-based policy by the Fed without any concomitant change in the legal basis for independence. De jure independence has not prevented the Fed from harmful departures from rules-based policies.

Featured

An Accidental Revolution

featuring Terry M. Moevia City Journal
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Terry Moe explores how Hurricane Katrina prompted New Orleans to reinvent its dysfunctional school system—and why education reform is so hard to achieve.

Featured

Modern Lessons From Adam Smith

interview with Russell Robertsvia Daily Economy
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Russ Roberts discusses Adam Smith, common economic misunderstandings, and the value of individual honor in western culture.

Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Lanhee Chen: China Sends Concerning Signal On Hong Kong

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Townhall Review
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

China recently claimed that it was the United States that instigated the waves of pro-democracy protests that have washed over Hong Kong in recent weeks. It’s a ridiculous claim, but unfortunately suggests the possibility that Beijing is foreshadowing a military intervention in Hong Kong to maintain control.

Analysis and Commentary

The Deep-Seated Authoritarian Impulse

by David R. Hendersonvia Econlib
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

If I were a state education minister I would endeavour to make it a compulsory part of a high school curriculum for students to have at least one field excursion to see with their own eyes a mine – or for that matter an iron smelter, a big factory or an agribusiness. But ideally a mine. I wouldn’t be able to force adults to go and visit anything, but I would happily encourage anyone out there who has never been anywhere close to a coal or a metal ore mine to put it on their travel and activity “to do” list.

Interviews
Interviews

Bill Evers On The Randy Tobler Show Podcast

interview with Williamson M. Eversvia The Randy Tobler Show Podcast
Saturday, August 3, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Evers discusses his Wall Street Journal column California Wants to Teach Your Kids That Capitalism Is Racist.

 
Interviews

Bill Whalen On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses Joe Biden's bid for the presidency.

Democrat's Donkey
Interviews

Bill Whalen On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Bill Whalenvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen discusses the Democrat's debates and who will be invited to the next debates.

Interviews

EconTalk Host Russ Roberts On Key Economic Concepts For Founders

interview with Russell Robertsvia Y Combinator
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Russ Roberts discusses key concepts and ideas for startups.

Interviews

John Yoo: California Is Trying To Meddle With Ballot To Oppose Trump

interview with John Yoovia Fox News
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow John Yoo discusses a new California law that requires release of tax returns to appear on the primary ballot.

In the News
Frank Dikötter, chair professor of humanities at the University of Hong Kong and the author of Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe
In the News

An Evening With Frank Dikötter In Conversation With Sam Leith

quoting Frank Diköttervia Eventbrite
Tuesday, September 3, 2019

How does a cult of personality begin – and how does it sustain itself? How do tyrants create the illusion of popular support – and what do they fear most?

In the News

New Scramble For Africa: Africa Will Be Next Major Battlefield In ‘Cold War’ Between The US And China, Experts Say

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Sun
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Africa looks set to be the next major battlefield in an emerging "Cold War" between the US and China, experts have claimed.

 

In the News

Why We Factor Suspension Rates Into How We Identify Top Schools For Underserved Students

quoting Chester E. Finn Jr.via EdSource
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

If a school has strong academic results, but high suspension rates, is that a problem? We think so. That, however, is not a view that is universally shared. 

In the News

Parent Engagement In Public Schools

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Overton County News
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Public policy must enable parents and community leaders to serve their schools, districts, and community more efficiently and effectively. Parents are the most important teachers of values to their children. Children benefit when they see their parents engaged in their education.

In the News

Pompeo Makes History In Pohnpei, Courts Pacific Allies

quoting Elizabeth Economyvia Saudi Gazette
Monday, August 5, 2019

Mike Pompeo became the first US Secretary of State to visit Micronesia Monday, as Washington's signaled a renewed interest in its Pacific allies, no matter how small, in the face of regional competition with China.

In the News

Social Security 2100 Act

quoting Charles Blahousvia Imperial Valley News
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Washington, DC - Social Security and its solvency have long been a top concern for AMAC – Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] and its nearly 2 million members. Long thought of as a political “third rail,” it is encouraging to see politicians in Washington attempting to address Social Security’s financial viability. Representative John Larson (D–Conn) has put forth “Social Security 2100 Act,” a comprehensive bill designed to strengthen the benefit for years.

In the News

‘Totally Unconstitutional.’ Trump Sues California Over New Law Targeting His Tax Returns

quoting John Yoovia The Sacramento Bee
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

California Gov. Gavin Newsom expresses support for Senate Bill 27, which would force presidential and gubernatorial candidates to release their tax returns to get their name on the state ballot. Trump's campaign believes the plan is unconstitutional.

In the News

Trump Administration Has Few Tools To Weaken The Dollar

quoting Michael D. Bordovia Financial Times
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

In early 2018, before an audience of chief executives and politicians at Davos, Steven Mnuchin got in trouble for saying the obvious: a weaker dollar would help US manufacturers export their products.

In the News

With Upcoming Second Spanish Conference, Intelligent Design’s European Footprint Grows

mentioning Hoover Institution, Peter M. Robinsonvia Evolution News & Science Today
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

You may remember the story of how the first European Conference on Intelligent Design (TDI Europe) was chased out of two universities in Portugal only to find refuge in León, Spain. Paul Nelson, who was there and traveled with the refugees (what else to call them?), told about his experiences in an article at Evolution News. 

In the News

Don’t Let Google Get Away With Censorship

mentioning Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Big tech companies enjoy legal immunity premised on the assumption they’ll respect free speech.