Thursday, July 1, 1999

1999 No. 3

And Now, The Good News

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

As the millennium approaches, Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell finds a few reasons for optimism.

Becker to Uncle Sam: Keep Your Hands Off Wall Street

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

President Clinton wants to invest some of the Social Security surplus in the stock market. Nobel laureate and Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker sees the president and raises him. Why we should privatize Social Security altogether

Getting Business Off the Dole

by Stephen Moorevia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Who are America’s costliest welfare recipients? Not unemployed men or single mothers, but the companies of the Fortune 500. Hoover visiting fellow Stephen Moore analyzes an outrage.

Why the Republican Congress Hasn’t Cut Your Taxes

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Republicans control both houses of Congress—yet taxes as a percentage of GDP remain at an all-time high. How can this be? Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell explains.

Itemize This

by Peter Brimelowvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow explores the high price of America’s onerous tax code.

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The Greedy Hand in a Velvet Glove

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

How a little-known man in the front office of Macy’s invented tax withholding and gave rise to the modern welfare state. By Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes.

Cancer Risk Analysis: New Science and Old Politics

by S. Fred Singervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

New breakthroughs have produced a method of testing for carcinogens that is as much as 100,000 times more sensitive than the techniques currently in use. Now the EPA faces a choice. It can embrace the new method, permitting scientists to determine the levels at which chemicals or radiation are safe. Or it can let politicians and environmental activists determine those levels. By Hoover fellow S. Fred Singer.

Farmers: Beware Drought, Pestilence, and the EPA

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

On the one hand, the federal government provides farmers with subsidies worth billions every year. On the other, it imposes arcane, burdensome regulations on the development of new crops, costing farmers billions every year. Hoover fellow Henry I. Miller explains how the government giveth and the government taketh away.

Racial Quotas in College Admissions: A Critique of the Bowen and Bok Study

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

In a new statistical analysis, two former Ivy League presidents argue that racial preferences in college admissions are good for both minorities and society at large. Examining the analysis, however, Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell has discovered that the numbers don’t add up.

Bye-Bye, Bilingual

by Peter J. Duignanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

English is the most widely spoken language in the world at large, but in many of America’s own classrooms it remains a foreign tongue. Peter Duignan argues that bilingual education has proven an abject failure—and must be abolished.

The Dangerous Federalization of Crime

by Edwin Meese IIIvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Federal crimes used to be limited to matters that truly involved the whole nation, such as treason and counterfeiting. But lately the federal government has been amending its criminal statutes to take over more and more criminal prosecution from the states. Hoover fellow Edwin Meese III on an especially pernicious form of federal aggrandizement.

Can America Keep Its Lead?

via Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

The information revolution might as well be stamped “made in America,” but there are signs that Taiwan, South Korea, and other nations are moving up on us fast. Hoover fellow Nicholas Imparato on what the United States must do to maintain its edge.

Al Gore: A Case Study

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

In dealing with the Champion Paper plant on the Pigeon River in North Carolina, Al Gore faced a choice: please a group of environmentalists or save 1,300 jobs. Guess what he decided. By Hoover media fellow Bob Zelnick.

Silverado Creek: A Tragedy of the Commons

by Tibor R. Machanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Why private property rights are good for the environment. By Hoover fellow Tibor R. Machan.

The Administration Gets It Half Right

by Abraham D. Sofaervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Abraham D. Sofaer explains what’s right—and wrong—with the administration’s latest antiterrorism proposal.

Bringing Rogue States to Justice

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Violent, tin-pot dictators, bloody regional conflicts, and “ethnic cleansing”—the post–Cold War world is in many ways more dangerous and chaotic than was the Cold War world itself. One critical weapon in the fight against rogue despots: international law. By Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

Institutions of Accountability

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

What do the otherwise disparate nations of Russia, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria—and, for that matter, dozens of others—have in common? Corruption. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond on how to stop it.

How the IMF Starts the Fires It’s Supposed to Put Out

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

How could the IMF best help the global economy? By declaring itself insolvent and going out of business. By Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro.

Providing for the Common Defense

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

North Korea and other outlaw states may soon be capable of targeting missiles at the American mainland. What are we doing to defend ourselves? Precious little. Hoover media fellow Michael Barone on the need for an antimissile defense.

A Warrior on War

by Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Discussing the conflict in the Balkans, General John Shalikashvili, former chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, offers American policymakers some advice. By Hoover associate director Richard Sousa.

From Seattle to Santiago, Let the Dollar Reign

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro endorses a plan that could bring much-needed economic stability to Central and South America. ¡Viva greenbacks!

A Dangerous Precedent

by William Ratliff, David Oppenheimervia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover fellow William Ratliff and David Oppenheimer explore the real lessons of the Kosovo conflict.

What I Saw

by John B. Dunlopvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

During the Azerbaijani presidential election last October, Hoover fellow John B. Dunlop served as an official observer. Here Dunlop describes what he saw: widespread poverty and massive election fraud.

Arsenal of Poison

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

The Tocqueville-quoting president of Iran, Mohammed Khatami, has impressed the West as a moderate—while at the same time amassing an arsenal of weapons of mass destruction. By Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman.

Midnight in Tehran

by Robert Mortonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover media fellow Robert Morton argues that the new regime in Iran is every bit as oppressive as its predecessor.

Hong Kong: Less Free to Choose

by Edward Neilanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover media fellow Edward Neilan discusses the sorry state of Hong Kong today. “To see how the free market really works,” Milton Friedman used to say, “Hong Kong is the place to go.” Would that it were still true.

Why China Doesn’t Need the WTO

by Charles Wolf Jr.via Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

The centerpiece of Chinese premier Zhu Rongji’s recent visit to Washington was to have been the announcement of a deal to usher China into the World Trade Organization. To the consternation of President Clinton, the deal fell through. Hoover fellow Charles Wolf Jr. asks, So what?

Beware the Funny Money

by Peter Brimelow, Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Hoover fellow Milton Friedman talks with Hoover media fellow Peter Brimelow about inflation, currency values, and the Asian crisis. An end-of-the-century interview with one of the century’s great economists.

How Liberals Funked It

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Liberals spent the Cold War refusing to see communism for what it was. Hoover fellow Robert Conquest on “how the mind of the liberal became so much a subject of self-deception.”

The Romanov Legacy

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

The Hoover Archives contains diaries, paintings, and other mementos from the family of Nicholas II, Russia’s last tsar. Hoover archivist Elena S. Danielson gives us a glimpse into the Romanov treasure trove.

The Document That Ended an Empire

by Charles G. Palmvia Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

Among the tens of thousands of documents housed in the Hoover Archives, none possesses greater importance than the abdication manifesto of Tsar Nicholas II. Hoover deputy director Charles G. Palm on the instrument that signaled the end of an empire.

A comprehensive listing

via Hoover Digest
Friday, July 30, 1999

A comprehensive listing of recent writings of Hoover fellows and publications from the Hoover Press.