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IT'S THE BIOLOGY, STUPID: The Policy Implications of Sociobiology

with Paul Ehrlich, Jeffrey Schloss, Lionel Tigervia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 1, 2001

Behavioral scientists have begun to argue that the findings of evolutionary science should have legal, political, and moral consequences. If behaviors such as procreation, aggression, or homosexuality are determined more by our biology than by our free will, then it is foolish, these scientists argue, to ignore that evidence. Does evolutionary science have any place in public policy? How useful is the knowledge of our biological evolution in determining the values of our legal, social, and political system?

HOT, HOT, HOT: The Future of Nuclear Power

with Dan Hirsch, A. David Rossin, Fred Wehlingvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 1, 2001

Is nuclear power making a comeback? More than twenty years after the accident at Three Mile Island and fifteen years after the reactor explosion at Chernobyl, the image of nuclear power seems to be changing once again. President Bush has included nuclear energy as part of his national energy plan. The nuclear industry has begun to promote nuclear energy as the clean energy alternative. And a recent poll showed that almost 60 percent of Californians favor nuclear power. So just how safe is nuclear power today? Does it make economic sense to start building new nuclear plants? And what do we do with the radioactive waste?

DONKEY KONG: The Future of the Democratic Party

with David M. Kennedy, Susan F. Raskyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, May 21, 2001

In 1936, Franklin Delano Roosevelt won reelection to a second term in one of the biggest landslides in American history. The outcome was a clear mandate in support of FDR's New Deal—an agenda of large-scale social and economic programs administered by the federal government. Sixty years later, in 1996, William Jefferson Clinton also won reelection to a second term, after declaring earlier that year that "the era of big government was over." How did the Democratic Party get from FDR to Bill Clinton? Now that the Democrats are out of the White House, will they continue the move to the center that Clinton initiated, or will they try to reinvigorate the traditional liberal base of the Democratic Party? Does that traditional base still exist?

YOU SAY YOU WANT A REPARATION: Reparations for Slavery

with Alfred Brophy, John McWhortervia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, May 21, 2001

In recent years, a movement has been calling for the United States government to pay reparations for slavery in America. What does the federal government owe the descendants of slaves in this country? Should such reparations be viewed as a gesture of recognition for past wrongs or as an attempt to actually correct those past wrongs? Would payment of reparations erase the lingering economic problems in the African American community or would they do more harm than good? And if reparations are a good idea, who should receive them, all African Americans or just those descended from slaves?

SUDAN IMPACT: The Crisis in Sudan

with Bishop Macram Max Gassis, J. Stephen Morrisonvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, May 21, 2001

An eighteen-year civil war between the Arab north and the African south has created a humanitarian crisis in Sudan. Secretary of State Colin Powell has said of Sudan, "There is perhaps no greater tragedy on the face of the earth today." President George W. Bush has promised, that under his administration, foreign involvements would take place only where direct American interests are at stake. Does the tragedy in Sudan warrant direct U.S. involvement? If so, just what can, and should, the United States do?

Making the Federalist Case: Separation of Powers, the Supreme Court vs. Congress

via Uncommon Knowledge
Saturday, May 5, 2001

Akhil Reed Amar and Douglas W. Kmiec discuss the separation of powers between the Supreme Court and Congress.

O Big Brother, Where Art Thou? Regulations and the Future of Cyberspace

via Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, April 27, 2001

Rich Karlgaard and Lawrence Lessig discuss the future of cyberspace.

Putting the SAT to the Test: The SATs and College Admission

via Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, April 23, 2001

M. R .C. Greenwood, Jay Rosner, and Martin Trow discuss the SATs and college admission.

Globalization and Its Discontents: The Impact of Globalization

via Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, April 13, 2001

Kevin Danaher and Adrian Wooldridge discuss the impact of globalization.

Under the Skin: Shelby Steele on Race in America

via Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, April 10, 2001

Shelby Steele discusses race in America

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For more than two decades the Hoover Institution has been producing Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson, a series hosted by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson as an outlet for political leaders, scholars, journalists, and today’s big thinkers to share their views with the world. Guests have included a host of famous figures, including Paul Ryan, Henry Kissinger, Antonin Scalia, Rupert Murdoch, Newt Gingrich, and Christopher Hitchens, along with Hoover fellows such as Condoleezza Rice and George Shultz.

“Uncommon Knowledge takes fascinating, accomplished guests, then sits them down with me to talk about the issues of the day,” says Robinson, an author and former speechwriter for President Reagan. “Unhurried, civil, thoughtful, and informed conversation– that’s what we produce. And there isn’t all that much of it around these days.”

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