Uncommon Knowledge

Subscribe to receive the Uncommon Knowledge email alert.Subscribe »

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Guest

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

THE RED AND THE BLUE: The Cultural and Political Divide in America

with Michael Barone, Ruy Teixeiravia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, January 22, 2002

Is America a divided nation? Sharp regional voting patterns were evident in the 2000 presidential election: rural, Midwestern, and southern voters went for Bush; urban and coastal voters went for Gore. These regional voting patterns have led some to describe America as one nation with two cultures. Is this an accurate way of looking at American society? Or is America divided along economic rather than cultural lines? Just how fundamental are these differences, and what impact will they have on the American political landscape?

EDUCATING BY NUMBERS: Standards, Testing, and Accountability in Education

with Williamson M. Evers, Elliot Eisnervia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, January 9, 2002

Will standards-based testing and accountability improve our nation's education system? In January 2002, President Bush signed into law the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002. The act calls for a mandatory annual test in reading and math for every child in the nation in the third through eighth grades. Schools that fail to improve their students' scores may be held accountable, possibly losing some federal funding. Supporters of the act say that standards-based testing and accountability are the best ways to monitor and improve the nation's schools. Opponents say that such a regime is largely a political ploy that will do more harm than good. Who's right?

MONEY RULES: The Role of the Federal Reserve

with Michael J. Boskin, Janet Yellenvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, January 9, 2002

Interest Rate adjustments by the Federal Reserve are among the most closely watched and anticipated of all economic policy decisions. Yet many economists believe the Fed no longer has the power it once did to regulate the economy. So just how powerful is the Fed today? What tools does the Fed have to regulate the economy, and how should they be used?

DARWIN UNDER THE MICROSCOPE: Questioning Darwinism

with William Dembski, Eugenie Scottvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, December 7, 2001

More than 140 years after Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species, his theory of evolution is still generating controversy. Although Darwinism is championed by the majority of the scientific community, some have claimed that Darwin's theory is bad science and have put forward their own, even more controversial theories. What should we make of these arguments? Is one such theory, known as Intelligent Design, merely creationism by another name, or is it a legitimate scientific alternative to Darwinism?

IN WHOSE IMAGE? Evolution and Spirituality

with William Dembski, Robert Russell, Eugenie Scottvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, December 7, 2001

Did life on earth unfold by chance or by design? According to the natural sciences and Darwin's theory of evolution, it was by chance. According to the Judeo-Christian tradition, it was by divine design. On this crucial question, science and religion appear to be irreconcilable. But are they? Does Darwinism encourage atheism? Must Christians be anti-Darwin?

FUTURE SHOCK: High Technology and the Human Prospect

with Bill Joy, Ray Kurzweilvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, December 7, 2001

Computers more intelligent than humans? Self-replicating molecular robots? Virtual immortality? These may sound like science fiction, but some reputable computer scientists are predicting they will happen within the next several decades. What will our world be like if and when our machines surpass us in intelligence? Do the advances in biotechnology, robotics, and nanotechnology, which make intelligent machines possible, pose dangers of their own? Should we embrace such a future or try to stop it?

THE WAR ON BUGS: Bioterrorism

with Abraham D. Sofaer, Jonathan B. Tucker, Dean Wilkeningvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, November 14, 2001

With the arrival of anthrax letters in Washington, New York, and Florida in the fall of 2001, the often-ignored threat of bioterrorism became a very frightening reality, causing illness and death and costing billions of dollars. How has this attack changed our assessment of the threat of biological and chemical weapons? What can and should be done to detect and control these weapons and defend ourselves against future attacks?

THE RULES OF THE GAME: Just War Doctrine

with Rev. Robert Sirico, Rev. William McLennan, Rabbi Daniel Lapinvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, November 14, 2001

Thou Shalt Not Kill—perhaps the most famous moral commandment in the western world. And yet Judeo-Christian religious leaders have also created a doctrine that can justify killing—commonly known as Just War Doctrine. What sort of military action does Just War Doctrine permit and what sort does it proscribe? Is America's campaign against terrorism a just war?

DISORDER IN THE COURT: The Supreme Court and the 2000 Election

with Pamela S. Karlan, Richard A. Posnervia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, November 14, 2001

On December 12, 2000, the Supreme Court of the United States brought an end to thirty-six days of dramatic vote recounts and legal challenges in the state of Florida. The decision let stand the initial results of Florida's election, which gave the state's electoral votes, and thus the Presidency, to George W. Bush. What was the legal justification for the Supreme Court's decision? Should the Court have intervened in the first place? And what precedent did the Court create for future elections?

THE GHOST OF COMMUNISM PAST: Reform in Russia and China

with Michael McFaul, Coit Blacker, Orville Schellvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, October 23, 2001

After two decades of reform, Stalin and Mao wouldn't recognize Russia and China today. But each state has taken a different path away from their communist past. Russia has emphasized democratic reforms while enduring economic instability. China has promoted economic growth based on market reforms, while maintaining tight control over politics. Which path will prove to be more successful, Russia's or China's?

Pages

Celebrating 23 Years of Uncommon Knowledge

Stay Up To Date!

Be notified when an new episode is released.

Subscriptions »

Subscribe To The Audio Version Here

Related Podcasts

 
The Classicist with Victor Davis Hanson:
 
libertarian_itunes-1400
 
 
 

For more than two decades the Hoover Institution has been producing Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson, a series hosted by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson as an outlet for political leaders, scholars, journalists, and today’s big thinkers to share their views with the world. Guests have included a host of famous figures, including Paul Ryan, Henry Kissinger, Antonin Scalia, Rupert Murdoch, Newt Gingrich, and Christopher Hitchens, along with Hoover fellows such as Condoleezza Rice and George Shultz.

“Uncommon Knowledge takes fascinating, accomplished guests, then sits them down with me to talk about the issues of the day,” says Robinson, an author and former speechwriter for President Reagan. “Unhurried, civil, thoughtful, and informed conversation– that’s what we produce. And there isn’t all that much of it around these days.”

The show started life as a television series in 1997 and is now distributed exclusively on the web over a growing network of the largest political websites and channels. To stay tuned for the latest updates on and episodes related to Uncommon Knowledge, follow us on Facebook and Twitter