Health Care Policy Working Group

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Lessons From The Hoover Policy Boot CampFeaturedHealth Care

Setting The Record Straight On America's Health Care With Scott Atlas

by Scott W. Atlasvia PolicyEd
Thursday, January 16, 2020

Health care is an important to everyone, but it is often misunderstood. The health care system in the United States is the best in the world when it comes to quality and access to medical care. Cost remains an issue, however, and effective reform would lower prices without impairing access, quality, or innovation.

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“Free” Health Care Isn’t

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

How single-payer systems fail their patients.

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The Fraud Of Single-Payer Health Care

by Scott W. Atlasvia The Washington Times
Wednesday, July 24, 2019

The consistent failures of single-payer health care worldwide are well-documented.

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Public Option Kills Private Insurance

by Scott W. Atlasvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

At the center of Joe Biden’s health-care proposal is the “public option”—a government insurance policy that would compete with private plans. Mr. Biden has obviously seen the polling. By 57% to 37%, Americans reject the idea, put forth by some of Mr. Biden’s Democratic rivals, of abolishing private insurance in favor of “Medicare for All.”

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Shop Till Medical Costs Drop

by Scott W. Atlasvia The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, June 6, 2019

In an effort to bring down the costs of medical care, the Trump administration wants to make prices visible to patients, and it’s moving aggressively to make that happen.

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The Conservative Case For Health Care

by Scott W. Atlasvia The Washington Times
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

The discussion about health care reform has changed dramatically to one of single-payer, government-run care vs. a patient-centered, competition-based, decentralized system. Let’s all first realize this: Today’s silence about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obamacare, exposes consensus acknowledgement of the failure of Obamacare.

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Transformational Health Care Reform

by Scott W. Atlasvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

The American health care system is on an unsustainable path characterized by government-dominated insurance. Fixing health care begins with changing the incentives and empowering consumers to seek value with their money, while increasing competition among providers. Liberalized HSAs, insurance with lower premiums and fewer mandates, and more options for Medicare and Medicaid enrollees will improve access, choice, and quality of health care.

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Single Payer’s Misleading Statistics

by Scott W. Atlasvia Wall Street Journal
Monday, December 17, 2018

[Subscription Required] Critics of American heath care—and advocates of single-payer insurance or other forms of socialized medicine—point to poor U.S. rankings in infant mortality and life expectancy. It turns out both are grossly flawed calculations that misleadingly make the U.S. rank low.

The StateFeatured

A Leading Physician And Health Policy Researcher Explains How To Reform Health Care

by Lee Ohanian interview with Scott W. Atlasvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, November 13, 2018

This week’s California on Your Mind commentary presents a question and answer session with Scott W. Atlas, MD about health care policy. Dr. Atlas is uniquely positioned to explain what is wrong with our current health care policies and what should be done to reform the system. Dr. Atlas is the David and Joan Traitel Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

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The Most Misunderstood Part Of Health Reform

by Scott W. Atlasvia The Washington Times
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

This week, the administration proposed loosening restrictions on employee accounts designated for health care. Perfect timing. Employees are now selecting 2019 benefits, and health care is the most valued of all.

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Member
David and Joan Traitel Senior Fellow
Leonard and Shirley Ely Senior Fellow
Keith and Jan Hurlbut Senior Fellow / Director of Research
Healthy, Wealthy and Wise

Hoover Institution Press Today Releases Book Highlighting a Market-Based Alternative to ObamaCare Healthy, Wealthy and Wise: Five Steps to a Better Health Care System (2nd ed.)

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
Stanford

In this second edition of Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise, the authors offer market-based reform alternatives to ObamaCare—the health care reform proposed in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) in 2010.

Press Releases
Eight Questions You Should Ask about Our Health Care System (Even if the Answers Make You Sick), by Charles E. Phelps.

Hoover Institution Press Releases Book Examining the Economic Issues Surrounding the U.S. Health Care System

Tuesday, June 15, 2010
Stanford

Hoover Institution Press today released Eight Questions You Should Ask about Our Health Care System (Even if the Answers Make You Sick), a book by Charles E. Phelps.

Press Releases
Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform

Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform by George P. Shultz and John B. Shoven

Monday, July 21, 2008
Stanford

A former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and an eminent economist, both Hoover Institution fellows, tackle the biggest social issue of our time in the book Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform (W.W. Norton, 2008).

Press Releases

The Working Group on Health Care Policy aims to devise public policies that enable more Americans to get better value for their health care dollar and foster appropriate innovations that will extend and improve life.

Key principles to guide the group's policy formation include focusing on the central role of individual choice and competitive markets in financing and delivering health services, individual responsibility for health behaviors and decisions, and appropriate guidelines for government intervention in health care markets.