Immigration Reform

Immigration Reform, Research Team

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Immigration
Analysis and Commentary

Obama's Immigration Failure

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Bloomberg View
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

President Barack Obama’s vow to use unilateral action to address some U.S. immigration challenges is disappointing because it is a nakedly political maneuver designed to benefit his fellow Democrats in this election cycle. It has significant, negative repercussions for policy, too.

Interviews

Tim Kane on Free Fire Radio (1:04:22)

interview with Timothy Kanevia Free Fire Radio
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Research Fellow Tim Kane will discuss his Balance of Economics piece, "Three Failures on Immigration Reform,” on Free Fire Radio. 

Chainlink fence with an american flag.
Interviews

Tim Kane on the Lars Larson Show (48:07)

interview with Timothy Kanevia Lars Larson Show
Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Research Fellow Tim Kane discussed his Balance of Economics piece, "Three Failures on Immigration Reform,” on the Lars Larson Show

Immigration
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Peregrine Podcast: “Rationalizing Immigration” with Lanhee Chen

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Peregrine
Friday, June 27, 2014

Lanhee Chen discusses how to better tailor America’s legal immigration system to the country’s economic needs and considers the political prospects for effective reform.

Immigration
New IdeasAnalysis and Commentary

The Economic Priority

by Beth Ann Bovinovia Peregrine
Friday, June 27, 2014

As the drive for US immigration reform becomes bogged down in election-year politics, one facet of the issue seems indisputable: An overhaul of the country’s immigration policy would be a boon to the world’s biggest economy.

Immigration Reform
Analysis and Commentary

Immigration and Wages

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Friday, June 27, 2014

Following up on my last immigration post, a thought occurred to me. The most common objection is the claim that letting immigrants in will hurt American wages. Before, I've addressed this on its merits: If labor doesn't move, capital will. Your doctor's lower wages are your lower health costs. Immigrants come for wide open jobs, and to start new businesses. And so on.

Immigration
New IdeasAnalysis and Commentary

A More Rational Approach

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Peregrine
Friday, June 27, 2014

It’s hard to define the right number of green cards precisely, but with millions of individuals waiting in line in other countries to get one, it seems fair to say that the current number of approximately one million per year is too low.

immigration reform
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Peregrine Podcast: “Finding an Immigration Equilibrium” with Richard Epstein

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Peregrine
Thursday, June 26, 2014

Richard Epstein argues that immigration reformers should focus on criteria for admitting new citizens, not trying to establish quotas.

New IdeasAnalysis and Commentary

Peregrine: Equilibrium for Immigrants

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Peregrine
Thursday, June 26, 2014

The question posed in this inaugural issue of Peregrine is deceptively simple and profoundly misleading.  What it asks us to do as legal and economic analysts is to make some empirical judgment as to the number and composition the immigration population.

Immigration
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Peregrine Podcast: “The Need for Skilled Immigration” with Clint Bolick

by Clint Bolickvia Peregrine
Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Clint Bolick explains why immigration reform needs to focus on America’s economic needs rather than on family unification.

Pages

Get the Facts!

The Hoover Institution's Conte Initiative on Immigration Reform is the result of significant scholarly workshops and conversations among academics, politicians, and Hoover fellows who are concerned with America's current immigration system.

The current system is complicated, restrictive, and badly in need of reform. It is ineffective at its stated goals of allowing sufficient immigration and punishing transgressors who overstay their visas or cross our borders illegally. A working group has been formed under this initiative that aims to improve immigration law by providing innovative ideas and clear improvements to every part of the system – from border security to green cards to temporary work visas. Our efforts are provided by Hoover scholars and leading affiliated thinkers and reformers from both sides of the aisle. Our membership is united by only one common theme: Our current system is broken and needs to be reformed.

Edward Lazear and Tim Kane co-chair the project as part of Conte Initiative on Immigration Reform with management and research support from Tom Church.