National Security, Technology & Law Working Group

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Blank Section (Placeholder)EssaysAnalysis and Commentary

The Important, Justifiable, And Constrained Role Of Nationality In Foreign Intelligence Surveillance

by Peter Swire, Jesse Woo, Deven R. Desaivia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

This article addresses whether governments ever have a justified basis for treating targets of surveillance differently, in any way, based on nationality. Topics include (1) three ways nationality can matter to surveillance; (2) reasons for stricter rules for law enforcement and domestic collection; (3) reasons for different rules based on the location of collection; (4) the universalist critique of surveillance laws based on nationality; and (5) reasons that can justify stricter surveillance rules based on nationality. Stricter protections are warranted because surveillance of nationals and others with a close connection to the domestic policy poses a special threat to the political opposition and free press of a country, both of which play crucial roles in limiting abuses of state power.

Analysis and Commentary

A Qualified Defense Of The Barr Memo: Part I

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Friday, January 4, 2019

Daniel Hemel and Eric Posner have harshly criticized William Barr’s memo on Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s obstruction of justice theory. They say (in the New York Times) that the memo “seriously damages [Barr’s] credibility and raises questions about his fitness for the Justice Department’s top position” and (later, on Lawfare) that the memo is “poorly reasoned.”

Analysis and Commentary

The Death Of Article II Treaties?

by Curtis A. Bradley, Oona A. Hathaway, Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Thursday, December 13, 2018

President Trump has submitted only one treaty to the Senate so far in his presidency. That is a historic low, and it is the latest sign that the Article II treaty process may be dying.

Analysis and Commentary

Winter 2018 Supplement For Bradley & Goldsmith, Foreign Relations Law: Cases And Materials

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Below is the Winter 2018 Supplement for Bradley & Goldsmith, Foreign Relations Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed. 2017). These materials cover, among many other things, the Supreme Court’s decision in Trump v. Hawaii (the “travel ban” case), which is excerpted with questions; the Supreme Court’s decision in Jesner v. Arab Bank concerning corporate liability under the Alien Tort Statute; the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal; legal issues raised by U.S. missile strikes against Syria.

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Flat Light

by Andrew Burt, Daniel E. Geer, Jr.via Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

The world of information security has always had reference points – or ground truths – that, like physical features in a landscape, served as navigational features for practitioners and policymakers alike. As time has passed and the state of information security has become more uncertain, these features have eroded. As reference points, they are now either unhelpful (at best) or disinformative (at worst). A deep state of disorientation is now upon us - in privacy, in security, and beyond. This paper explains how we arrived at this point, and suggests what to do next.

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2018 And Beyond

by John P. Carlin, David A. Newmanvia Aegis Paper Series
Monday, November 12, 2018

Despite the assessment that Russia interfered in the 2016 election and will continue this type of activity in the future, there has been little national action. This paper contends that the inaction partially stems from political and bureaucratic obstacles to preparing a US response to any future interference—including obstacles to overcoming public apathy, the concern that any measures taken might favor one political party, and federalism questions that arise whenever the federal government considers proposals affecting state election conduct. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Watergate Road Map: What It Says And What It Suggests For Mueller

by Jack Goldsmith, Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

In neat script near the top of the document, someone has written, “Filed under seal, March 1, 1974.” Above that, red typed letters read, “Unsealed October 11, 2018 by Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Order No. 11-mc-44 (BAH).

Analysis and Commentary

Jaworski Road Map To Be Mostly Unsealed

by Stephen Bates, Jack Goldsmith, Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Monday, October 15, 2018

One month ago, the three of us filed a petition in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for the release of the so-called “Watergate Road Map”—one of the last great still-secret Watergate documents. Last week, Chief Judge Beryl Howell, acting in a separate case, ordered the document’s release. The move, as Josh Gerstein notes in this Politico story, appears to have been prompted by our petition, on which we have been represented by the folks at Protect Democracy. 

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Fixing Social Media’s Grand Bargain

by Jack M. Balkinvia Aegis Paper Series
Monday, October 15, 2018

To regulate social media, we should focus on its political economy: the nature of digital capitalism and how we pay for the digital public sphere. This political economy creates perverse incentives for social media companies—encouraging them to surveil, addict, and manipulate their end users and strike deals with third parties who will further manipulate them. Treating social media companies as public forums or public utilities is not the proper cure, but social media companies, whether they like it or not, do have public obligations. This essay focuses on one approach to dealing with the problems of social media: new fiduciary obligations that protect end user privacy and counteract social media companies’ bad incentives.

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The Great Delusion with John J Mearsheimer

interview with John J. Mearsheimer, Jack Goldsmithvia Security by the Book
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
The Hoover Institution hosted "Security by the Book with John J. Mearsheimer" on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 from 5:30pm - 6:30pm EST.

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Aegis on Lawfare

 
Aegis explores legal and policy issues at the intersection of technology and national security.  Published in partnership with Lawfare, it features long-form essays of the working group, examines major new books in the field, and carries podcasts and videos or the working group’s events in Washington and Stanford.

Security by the Book Podcasts

The Security by the Book podcast series features monthly interviews with authors of important, new national security-oriented books and publications.

In the News

Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers And The Secret Intelligence War Against The Soviet Union

Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers And The Secret Intelligence War Against The Soviet Union" on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event
Analysis and Commentary

Dark Territory: The Secret History Of Cyber War

Wednesday, June 15, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Dark Territory: The Secret History Of Cyber War" on Wednesday, June 15, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event

Constitutionality Of The U.S. Drone War

Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Targeting Americans: Constitutionality Of The U.S. Drone War" on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event
In the News

Home Sweet Homeland: Lessons For A More Resilient Nation

Tuesday, April 26, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Home Sweet Homeland: Lessons For A More Resilient Nation" on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event
In the News

Using Data To Secure Networks

Thursday, April 14, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Using Data To Secure Networks: Optimizing Individual Privacy While Achieving Strong Security" on Thursday, April 14, 2016 from 12:00pm - 2:00pm. The event video is below.

Event
In the News

The Hacked World Order

Monday, March 28, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "The Hacked World Order" on Monday, March 28, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event
In the News

American Intelligence In The Age Of Terror

Friday, March 11, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "American Intelligence In The Age Of Terror" on Friday, March 11, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm. The event video is below.

Event
In the News

Law As A Weapon Of War

Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Law as a Weapon of War" on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm. The event was recorded and can be listened to below.

Event
In the News

The Next Wave Of Surveillance Reform

Monday, January 25, 2016 to Tuesday, January 26, 2016
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The National Security, Technology, and Law Working Group at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University is hosting a symposium on “The Next Wave of Surveillance Reform,” taking place on January 25 and 26, 2016, at the Hoover Institution in Stanford, CA.

- By Invitation Only -

Event
In the News

Women Soldiers On The Battlefield

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution's National Security, Technology, and Law Working Group, along with Hoover's Washington, DC office, hosted a discussion on the growing role of women soldiers in special operations and beyond in America's post-9/11 wars on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 from 5:00pm - 7:00pm.

Event

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The Working Group on National Security, Technology, and Law brings together national and international specialists with broad interdisciplinary expertise to analyze how technology affects national security and national security law and how governments can use that technology to defend themselves, consistent with constitutional values and the rule of law.

The group will focus on a broad range of interests, from surveillance to counterterrorism to the dramatic impact that rapid technological change—digitalization, computerization, miniaturization, and automaticity—are having on national security and national security law. Topics include cybersecurity, the rise of drones and autonomous weapons systems, and the need for and dangers of state surveillance. The group’s output will also be published on the Lawfare blog, which covers the merits of the underlying legal and policy debates of actions taken or contemplated to protect the nation and the nation’s laws and legal institutions.

Jack Goldsmith is the chair of the National Security, Technology, and Law Working Group.