The Renewing Indigenous Economies Project

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Renewing Indigenous Economies

Renewing Indigenous Economies: An Interview with Misty Kuhl, Aaniiih Member

interview with Misty Kuhlvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 23, 2020

Misty Kuhl is a member the Fort Belknap Indian Community, a first-generation college graduate, and the director of Native American Outreach at Rocky Mountain College.

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Reservation Capitalism

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Lance Morgan is the CEO of Ho-Chunk, Inc., a $100 million tribal economic development corporation that employs nearly 400 people. Tribal leaders and entrepreneurs such as Morgan are part of an economic civil rights movement emerging in indigenous communities around the world. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, which owns Ho-Chunk, Inc., started with a casino, then diversified to earn the revenue needed to build the necessary infrastructure for prosperous tribal economies. 

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The Bonds Of Colonialism

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Defining Ideas
Friday, April 26, 2019

American Indians as Wards of the State.

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Native American Heritage: It’s Not What You Think

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, February 12, 2019

The ideas defining a free Native American society.

Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium

featuring Hernando de Soto
Tuesday, October 2, 2018

The Hoover Institution hosted "Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium" on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST.

Renewing Indigenous Economies Talk By James A. Robinson

by James A. Robinson
Monday, September 24, 2018

Renewing Indigenous Economics Forum talk by James A. Robinson Professor, University of Chicago, on Why Indian Nations Fail on Monday, September 24, 2018 at Stauffer Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

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Renewing Indigenous Economies Essays

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Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution hosted "Renewing Indigenous Economies Policy Symposium" on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST.

Event

Indigenous Economies Policy Roundtable

Monday, October 1, 2018 to Tuesday, October 2, 2018
Hoover Institution, Washington DC

The Hoover Institution gathered Indigenous community leaders and policymakers from the United States, Canada, and New Zealand to identify obstacles to unlocking human capital and natural resources on reservations, and to share best practices for expanding tribal jurisdiction and improving tribal governance.

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In the News

Renewing Indigenous Economies Talk By James A. Robinson

Monday, September 24, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Renewing Indigenous Economics Forum talk by James A. Robinson Professor, University of Chicago, on Why Indian Nations Fail on Monday, September 24, 2018 at Stauffer Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University. 

 

Event

Tribal Leaders Forum

Sunday, September 23, 2018 to Tuesday, September 25, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

To foster the philosophical revolution and economic civil rights movement emerging indigenous communities around the world, the Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous economies will gather tribal leaders and scholars to share best practices from successful tribal leaders; and prioritize the development of educational resources and workshops.

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Renewing Indigenous Economies Research Workshop

Thursday, September 20, 2018 to Saturday, September 22, 2018
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies commissioned original research to explore how tribal governance structures, jurisdiction, property rights, and the rule of law integrate into a fabric for stimulating indigenous economies. The main focus will be on indigenous economies in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia because these four countries share a history of British colonization and have thus inherited a common institutional framework within which tribal economies operate.

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The Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies is dedicated to understanding how the rich history of governance, entrepreneurship, and trade allowed indigenous peoples to thrive before colonization and how restoring these traditions can help rebuild indigenous economies, cultures, and communities from the ground up.

In North America, as the United States expanded West, traditional governments were displaced by imperialist institutions that are perpetuated by the federal government to this day. Native Americans are more likely than non-Natives to fall below the poverty line, to be assaulted, incarcerated, or to commit suicide. The disparities between Native Americans and other Americans are not the result of culture or lack of resources, but are the result of an institutional gap — a lack of secure land title, clearly defined jurisdictions, and effective governance structures. As islands of poverty in a sea of wealth, most American Indian reservations provide a stark picture of what federal government interference can do to stifle human dignity, prosperity, and freedom.

Parallel stories exist in indigenous economies throughout the Americas and, indeed, around the world, where colonizers — whether Dutch, French, Portuguese, or Spanish — similarly displaced peoples and disregarded traditional cultures, governance structures, and ownership claims.

As Hoover’s research and successful indigenous economies have shown, renewing indigenous economies is a matter of adapting old institutions that worked and discovering new ones that allow reservation communities and residents to fully participate in and benefit from the modern global economy.

The Hoover Project on Renewing Indigenous Economies works with scholars, tribal leaders, educators, and emerging indigenous leaders from around the world to foster the exchange of knowledge and skills necessary for successful tribal governance and entrepreneurship; promotes policy education to inform people of the obstacles faced by tribal leaders and entrepreneurs; and advances reforms that would remove those obstacles.