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Policy StoriesFeatured

Three Ways To Keep Businesses And People In California

by Lee Ohanianvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, May 24, 2022

California’s strict regulatory environment, punitive legal climate, and high tax rates are causing businesses and residents to leave the state at an unprecedented rate.

PoliticsAnalysis and Commentary

“Shop ‘Til You Drop” In California, But Don’t Take The Show To Ohio

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, May 19, 2022

The grass may not be greener on the other side coast, given California’s rain-starved, ever-browning landscape, but still, you can’t blame national Democrats for envying their Golden State kin.

EconomyFeatured

California Will Spend $23,000 Per Household In 2023 State Budget. What Will Taxpayers Get?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

With a nearly $100 million budget surplus, California governor Gavin Newsom has proposed a $300 billion state budget for the next fiscal year. If adopted by the state legislature, this budget works out to nearly $23,000 in spending per California household and would be about 50 percent larger than the budget from just two years ago. 

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: What May Come From The “May Revise”

interview with Lee Ohanian, Bill Whalen, Jonathan Movroydisvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Thursday, May 12, 2022

The latest in the Golden State, including what if any progress will be achieved on homelessness, a worsening drought, and California’ stuck-in-a-rut high-speed rail project.

PoliticsFeatured

Revamping California’s Government: My Two Cents . . . My Two Dollars

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, May 12, 2022

Two pieces of Sacramento-posted mail showed up at my home late last week—each a reminder of the Golden State’s shortcomings.

HousingFeatured

Despite Spending $1.1 Billion, San Francisco Sees Its Homelessness Problems Spiral Out Of Control

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

San Francisco is slightly smaller than Jacksonville, Florida. Yet San Francisco’s homelessness budget—$1.1 billion in fiscal year 2021–22—is nearly 80 percent of Jacksonville’s entire city budget. But despite this enormous spending, homelessness and the attendant problems of drug abuse, crime, public health issues, and an overall deterioration in the quality of life, spiral further downwards each year.

Featured

Why Twitter Could Start Winging Its Way To Texas

by Bill Whalenvia The Washington Post
Monday, May 9, 2022

The day after news broke that Twitter had accepted Elon Musk’s purchase offer, California’s Democratic governor, Gavin Newsom, happened to be holding a Zoom call with supporters to discuss how to “keep California blue in 2022.” The topic was a curious one, given that since 2000, Democrats have won 47 of the past 48 statewide races here not involving Arnold Schwarzenegger.

EnvironmentFeatured

An Energy-Shy California Explores Its Nuclear Option

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Wednesday, May 4, 2022

This is a cautionary tale of two heads of state looking at uncomfortable scenarios that involve a “nuclear option.”

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: Exit Sussexes, Enter AOC?

interview with Lee Ohanian, Bill Whalen, Jonathan Movroydisvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Thursday, April 28, 2022

The latest in the Golden State, including forthcoming water restrictions in the Southland and Sacramento’s sudden complacency regarding gasoline prices.

Analysis and Commentary

Tearing Down The Silicon Valley Wall

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Townhall
Thursday, April 28, 2022

Elon Musk has finally managed to buy Twitter. And the moment he did, the enraged Left flipped out.

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