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Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California
In the News

California Hits Greenhouse Gas Emission Cutting Goal

quoting Jeremy Carlvia Island Daily Tribune
Thursday, July 12, 2018
California hits greenhouse gas emission cutting goal, indicating the state’s effort in fighting against climate change. California’s greenhouse gas pollution has fallen below 1990 levels, the state’s Air Resources Board claims.
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Green Grows the Market

by Lee Ohanian, Ted Temzelidesvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 9, 2018

Energy breakthroughs arise from neither political patronage nor government subsidies.

In the News

Silicon Valley Energy Summit Addresses Energy Efficiency

quoting James L. Sweeneyvia The Stanford Daily
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Attendees at the annual Silicon Valley Energy Summit (SVES) on Thursday, Jun. 21 developed plans that may enhance energy efficiency, both in the United States and worldwide. The event, which occurs annually, addressed contemporary issues with energy that affect both individuals and firms.

In the News

Media Favor California Solar Mandate That Will Cost $10K Per Home

quoting Lee Ohanianvia News Busters, Media Research Center
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

California is king when it comes to environmental regulations, but the latest decision to mandate solar panels comes at a high price. For homeowners.

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California’s Solar Rooftop Mandate Doesn’t Make Economic Sense

by Lee Ohanian, Ted Temzelidesvia San Francisco Chronicle
Friday, May 18, 2018

This month, the California Energy Commission voted to require that almost all new California housing include rooftop solar panels. The commission estimates that after three years, the solar mandate will have the same effect on carbon reduction as eliminating 115,000 cars. But this represents only 0.8 percent of California’s registered motor vehicles.

Featured

Alexander Hamilton's Solar Panels

by John H. Cochrane via The Grumpy Economist
Friday, May 18, 2018

I think I finally have figured out why California is mandating solar panels on top of houses.

Intellections

Energy Efficiency: Our Best Source Of Clean Energy

by James L. Sweeneyvia PolicyEd.org
Friday, April 21, 2017

Increases in energy efficiency are an often-forgotten component of our shift to clean energy and reduced carbon emissions. Higher prices triggered by the 1973 oil embargo caused America to drastically change how it used energy. The ensuing gains in efficiency had more of an impact on America’s energy consumption than all of the growth in solar, wind, geothermal, natural gas and nuclear energy combined.

Just The Fracts

Top 5 Reasons Fracking Regulations Are Whack

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

The current approach to mitigating hydraulic fracturing’s risks is top-down, command-and-control government regulation. But this system is highly inefficient and ineffective at balancing the risks and rewards of fracturing. Why? Regulation imposes costs on consumers, typically benefits special interests, limits competition, and shields bad actors from liability. Meanwhile, property rights and water markets can better mitigate the risks, while also promoting the benefits.

Just The Fracts

Swipe Right: Seeking Fracturing Policy Alternatives

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Requiring hydraulic fracturing operators to tag their fracturing fluids with tracers helps enforce the property rights of others who may be harmed. This, in turn, enables more use of insurance, surety bonding, self-regulation, and third-party verification/certification to reduce and protect against the real but rare risks of fracturing. Property rights hold producers accountable and take advantage of fracturing benefits.

Just The Fracts

Getting The Fracts Straight

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

All forms of energy production have their risks, but scientific research suggests that hydraulic fracturing’s risks of water use, water contamination, or induced seismic activity from improper fluid disposal are rare, overblown, or easily mitigated. Like other energy productions, we have to weigh the risks and rewards. Estimates suggest fracturing will create almost 4 million jobs and pump almost $500 billion in the U.S.’s economy by 2035.

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Energy Policy Task Force


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.