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Big Trouble on the High Seas

by James E. Fanellvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, July 30, 2006

China and Japan can't seem to stop sparring over disputed islands in the East China Sea—and the vast oil reserves underneath. By Jim Fanell.

Analysis and Commentary

Europe must not trade its principles for Russian gas

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Financial Times
Monday, July 10, 2006

On the eve of the summit of the Group of Eight industrialised nations, which opens this week in St Petersburg, Europeans are faced with a delicate balancing act in their policy towards Russia…

Analysis and Commentary

How Oil Lubricates Our Enemies

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Enterprise Institute
Wednesday, June 21, 2006

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, Marxism was discredited as an unworkable--and often murderous--alternative to consumer capitalism…

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The High Price of Oil—and of Demagoguery

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

Big Oil may be an easy target for politicians, but every investigation into high gas prices turns up a single culprit—supply and demand. Go figure. By Thomas Sowell.

The Gas War

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 30, 2006

The dispute over gas prices between Russia and Ukraine lasted just long enough to offer a disquieting glimpse of the future—Russian extortion of the West. By Michael Mcfaul.

The Nuclear Option

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Sunday, October 30, 2005

It’s time to go nuclear. Gary S. Becker explains.

Red Dragon, Black Gold

by William Ratliffvia Hoover Digest
Saturday, April 30, 2005

China has a voracious need for imported oil. Can the planet handle another economic superpower? By William Ratliff.

THE BOTTOMLESS WELL: Are We Running out of Energy?

with Peter W. Huber, Jonathan Koomeyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, February 11, 2005

Many petroleum experts predict that world oil production will peak by the end of the decade. Will the United States soon be entering a period of worsening energy shortages and soaring energy costs? And, if so, what should the government to do about it? Or will the ever-improving technological efficiencies of the free market provide access to virtually endless sources of new energy? Peter Robinson speaks with Peter Huber and Jonathan Koomey.

Analysis and Commentary

Price Controls on Gasoline? Bad Idea

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, June 23, 2004

Many people are convinced that high gasoline prices are due to oil companies' greed. But that explanation is insufficient.

Russia's Oil in America's Future: Policy, Pipelines, and Prospects

by William Ratliffvia Analysis
Monday, September 1, 2003

Presidents George Bush and Vladimir Putin will hold a summit at the end of September that will focus on economic and other ties between the United States and Russia. The two presidents have long recognized the central position of energy in our bilateral relations, and in that sphere, nothing is as critical as oil. Today Russia may again be the largest oil exporter in the world, but very little yet comes to the United States. Russia’s oil industry is dominated by rich and aggressive young private companies. Generally, they are eager to deal with foreigners, but despite significant state reforms they often are still inhibited by a dilapidated, state-controlled delivery system and a residue of traditional thinking and institutions. Many of Russia’s as-yet-unresolved post-Soviet prob-lems exploded in mid-2003 when the prosecutor general’s office attacked Yukos, the country’s most modernized, productive and pro-American private oil company. Thus even as Washington and American oil industry leaders actively sought alternatives to unstable sources in the Middle East, Africa and Latin America, basic questions re-emerged in Russia about the privatizations of the 1990s, the security of private property, the mixing of law and politics, and the exercise of power in the Kremlin. Today Russians, with the support of American and European allies, must create conditions that will welcome the foreign funds, technology, and expertise needed to develop the critical oil industry but also to lay foundations of law and infrastructure that will help make Russia a stable member of the world community. Americans must decide how much involvement Russia can constructively absorb to promote not only short-term oil supplies but also long-term Russian development and broader U.S. foreign policy goals. Finally, the critical long-term lesson of 9/11 and other recent experiences for Americans is that even as we cultivate Russia as an ally and major source of oil, we must actively develop alternative sources of energy. In an unstable world, the United States must not forever be held hostage by other nations with their often very different cultures, institutions and interests.

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Energy Policy Task Force


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.