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THE BOTTOMLESS WELL: Are We Running out of Energy?

with Peter W. Huber, Jonathan Koomeyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, February 11, 2005

Many petroleum experts predict that world oil production will peak by the end of the decade. Will the United States soon be entering a period of worsening energy shortages and soaring energy costs? And, if so, what should the government to do about it? Or will the ever-improving technological efficiencies of the free market provide access to virtually endless sources of new energy? Peter Robinson speaks with Peter Huber and Jonathan Koomey.

Analysis and Commentary

Price Controls on Gasoline? Bad Idea

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, June 23, 2004

Many people are convinced that high gasoline prices are due to oil companies' greed. But that explanation is insufficient.

Russia's Oil in America's Future: Policy, Pipelines, and Prospects

by William Ratliffvia Analysis
Monday, September 1, 2003

Presidents George Bush and Vladimir Putin will hold a summit at the end of September that will focus on economic and other ties between the United States and Russia. The two presidents have long recognized the central position of energy in our bilateral relations, and in that sphere, nothing is as critical as oil. Today Russia may again be the largest oil exporter in the world, but very little yet comes to the United States. Russia’s oil industry is dominated by rich and aggressive young private companies. Generally, they are eager to deal with foreigners, but despite significant state reforms they often are still inhibited by a dilapidated, state-controlled delivery system and a residue of traditional thinking and institutions. Many of Russia’s as-yet-unresolved post-Soviet prob-lems exploded in mid-2003 when the prosecutor general’s office attacked Yukos, the country’s most modernized, productive and pro-American private oil company. Thus even as Washington and American oil industry leaders actively sought alternatives to unstable sources in the Middle East, Africa and Latin America, basic questions re-emerged in Russia about the privatizations of the 1990s, the security of private property, the mixing of law and politics, and the exercise of power in the Kremlin. Today Russians, with the support of American and European allies, must create conditions that will welcome the foreign funds, technology, and expertise needed to develop the critical oil industry but also to lay foundations of law and infrastructure that will help make Russia a stable member of the world community. Americans must decide how much involvement Russia can constructively absorb to promote not only short-term oil supplies but also long-term Russian development and broader U.S. foreign policy goals. Finally, the critical long-term lesson of 9/11 and other recent experiences for Americans is that even as we cultivate Russia as an ally and major source of oil, we must actively develop alternative sources of energy. In an unstable world, the United States must not forever be held hostage by other nations with their often very different cultures, institutions and interests.

Analysis and Commentary

Goldilocks and the Three [Russian] Bears

by Alvin Rabushka, Michael S. Bernstamvia russianeconomy.org
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

Goldilocks has entered the Russian bears' house. High oil prices will harm growth. Low oil prices will harm growth. Only the right oil prices will foster growth.

Analysis and Commentary

Wind for Sale

by Laura E. Hugginsvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, October 8, 2001

Much of the growth in wind-produced energy is due to the development of more efficient turbines.

California Steamin’

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

Contrary to the conventional wisdom, California’s energy problems are not the result of deregulation but of reregulation. By Hoover fellow David R. Henderson.

What California Must Do

by Pete Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

What can Gray Davis, the current governor of California, do to end California’s energy crisis? Hoover fellow Pete Wilson, the former governor of California, has a few suggestions.

How to Turn the Lights Back On

by Thomas Gale Moorevia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 30, 2001

The only real solution to California’s energy crisis? Let the market work. By Hoover fellow Thomas Gale Moore.

HOT, HOT, HOT: The Future of Nuclear Power

with Dan Hirsch, A. David Rossin, Fred Wehlingvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 1, 2001

Is nuclear power making a comeback? More than twenty years after the accident at Three Mile Island and fifteen years after the reactor explosion at Chernobyl, the image of nuclear power seems to be changing once again. President Bush has included nuclear energy as part of his national energy plan. The nuclear industry has begun to promote nuclear energy as the clean energy alternative. And a recent poll showed that almost 60 percent of Californians favor nuclear power. So just how safe is nuclear power today? Does it make economic sense to start building new nuclear plants? And what do we do with the radioactive waste?

Analysis and Commentary

The IMF, Oil, and Russian Economic Policy

by Alvin Rabushka, Michael S. Bernstamvia russianeconomy.org
Tuesday, May 1, 2001

Given the IMF's assessment of Russia's current favorable macroeconomic environment (strong reserves, balanced budget, stable currency), the IMF states that the time is ripe to make progress on such structural and institutional reforms as creating a real banking sector and further reduce arrears. What's lacking in the IMF Outlook?

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Energy Policy Task Force


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.