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Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Grumpy Economist: What’s In The Reconciliation Bill? A Conversation With Casey Mulligan

interview with Casey B. Mulliganvia The Grumpy Economist | A Podcast with John H. Cochrane
Tuesday, October 5, 2021

The  incentives and disincentives in the reconciliation bill.

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Michael J. Boskin: Assessing The Federal Government’s COVID-19 Relief And Response Efforts And Its Impact – Part II

with Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Daily Report
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Boskin testifies on “Assessing the Federal Government’s COVID-19 Relief and Response Efforts and its Impact – Part II” before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

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Fourth Estate Or Fifth Wheel? The Role Of The Media In Education Reform

via Hoover Podcasts
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

The general media is the primary source of information about efforts to improve public education in the U.S.  Can they serve a critical role in the recovery of public education from COVID?  Do we need to watch the watchdogs? The Hoover Education Success Initiative (HESI) hosts, Fourth estate or fifth wheel?  The role of the media in education reform, on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 at 1PM PT. Register to attend.

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: School Re-Openings – Following The Political Science

interview with Michael T. Hartneyvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

The ascent of teachers’ unions and the role that unions played during the past year’s school-reopening drama.

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A Bill That Costs Too Much, Does Too Little

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Defining Ideas
Monday, September 27, 2021

Biden’s “infrastructure,” a fantasy mix of taxes and subsidies, is a poor second to systematic deregulation.

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Federalism: A Cure For What Ails The U.S.

by Clint Bolickvia The Washington Times
Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Of late it seems our nation is neither one nor indivisible. The divide between red and blue America is palpable, extreme and so rancorous it sometimes spills into violence. Bipartisanship is largely defunct and our nation’s legislative branch essentially frozen.

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Michael J. Boskin: Assessing The Federal Government’s COVID-19 Relief And Response Efforts And Its Impact

with Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Daily Report
Thursday, July 29, 2021

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Boskin testifies on “Assessing the Federal Government’s COVID-19 Relief and Response Efforts and its Impact” before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: Entitled To What?

interview with Daniel Heil, Bill Whalenvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Wednesday, July 7, 2021

The ramifications should an additional 21 million Americans – and more than half the nation’s working-age households – become dependent upon the federal government. 

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Capital Gains Tax Hike: No Gains, No Fairness

by David R. Hendersonvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, May 6, 2021

California lawmakers have a special reason to oppose Biden’s proposal: a big cut in Sacramento’s tax revenue.

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Originalism As King

by John Yoo featuring Michael McConnellvia The Federalist Society
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Reading Robert Bork’s 1990 The Tempting of America can evoke a poignant wistfulness. The Tempting of America confirmed the rigorous originalism that a Justice Bork would have brought to a Supreme Court so badly in need of principles of interpretation. If Robert Bork had won confirmation, rather than Anthony Kennedy, the Supreme Court might have begun its journey toward originalism in 1987, rather than three decades later. 

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