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In the News

5 Real Solutions For The Troubled Cities Democrats Helped Cripple

quoting Thomas Sowellvia The Federalist
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Democrats have run America's most dangerous cities for decades. They have no answers. Here are five solutions to fix the problems Democrat policies made worse.

In the News

Why Democrats Lose

featuring Jonathan Roddenvia City Journal
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

For many urbanites, “rural America” is another way of saying “provincialism.” City-dwellers—especially on the coasts—give a strong impression of disdaining heartland voters and blaming them for unfavorable election results. A liberal policy agenda, they believe, would thrive if not for partisan gerrymandering, which favors sparsely populated areas.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: Land Use And The Little Guy

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

How big-city regulators impede growth, exploit citizens, and cater to powerful interests.

Featured

The Economy, Father Of Us All

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Good times immunize a president and make his over-the-top domestic enemies look irrelevant.

HousingFeatured

What Do Silicon Valley Tech Workers Earning $100,000 Call An Old Van? Home.

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

It takes an annual income of about $130,000 to qualify for renting the average apartment (less than 800 square feet of living space) in the technology hubs of Silicon Valley and San Francisco, where the average monthly rent is about $3,250. This minimum qualifying income is at the 93rd percentile of the US earnings distribution and is nearly $60,000 higher than the median salary for individuals in San Francisco.

Friedman FundamentalsFeatured

The Good Intentions And Unfortunate Consequences Of Government Programs

by Milton Friedmanvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Milton Friedman explains that in case after case, government programs adopted for good purposes have had the opposite effects. Federal programs on housing, schooling, health care, and job training have created as many problems as they have solved. There are almost no exceptions of governmental programs that have achieved their initial stated goals.

In the News

A Modest Proposal On Housing Border-Crossers And Other Commentary

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia New York Post
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Conservative: Where To House Border-Crossers Reviewing the controversy over detention centers for illegal border-crosses, National Review’s Victor Davis Hanson proposes a tongue-in-cheek “solution” to housing people now stuck in what some Democrats call “concentration camps”: Since it’s summer, “America’s 4,000 colleges and universities have plenty of empty dorm space and underutilized ­facilities.”

In the News

Welcome To California

quoting Lee Ohanianvia City Journal
Monday, July 8, 2019

After enduring decades of red tape, some developers are seeing their projects through.

HousingFeatured

The Backwards Economics Of San Francisco’s Homeless Policies

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, July 2, 2019

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors just approved a plan to build a homeless shelter. The problem is that the location of the shelter is on the city’s waterfront Embarcadero, which happens to be the most expensive neighborhood in San Francisco, where home sales have averaged nearly $1,200 per square foot. The ground leasing rights for the city’s Ferry Building, just down the street and on a similar size parcel, sold for $291 million earlier this year.

In the News

‘Why Cities Lose’ Review: Where Politics Meets Geography

featuring Jonathan Roddenvia The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Why have American politics become so polarized? One reason is that in recent years, while Democratic politicians have increased their dominance in urban areas ever further, the traditional rural support base for Democratic candidates in Appalachia and the South has collapsed. Conservative “blue dog” Democrats are nearly extinct.

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