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Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson | The Classical Tradition

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia HuffDuffer
Monday, December 10, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson explains the classical tradition, its importance to the development of western civilization, as well as why it is being forgotten and trodden upon today.

Analysis and Commentary

George H.W. Bush, Pearl Harbor And America’s Other Fallen

by Markos Kounalakisvia Miami Herald
Friday, December 7, 2018
George H.W. Bush survived an airplane crash in Japan’s Pacific Ocean in September of 1944. Seventy-four years later, on Wednesday of this week, two Marines were recovered in the same Bush-ditched cold waters when a couple of planes went down in a mid-air collision.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

A Man Of His Times

by Giselle Donnellyvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, December 5, 2018

The passing of president George Herbert Walker Bush has, inevitably, recalled his role in the most momentous moments of the late 20th century: the fall of the Berlin Wall in the fall of 1989 and the complete collapse of the Soviet empire two years later. That this came about peacefully is still something of a wonder, and is alone more than enough to enshrine our 41st president as a superb statesman.

Will America or China Prevail in the Trade War?

by Bing West via Military History in the News
Friday, November 30, 2018

While the Constitution vests in the Congress the power to declare war, American presidents wield great discretion in initiating hostilities. Lyndon B. Johnson dribbled troops into combat in Vietnam in a series of halfway measures that led to disaster. After taking care to build a broad alliance, George H. W. Bush ordered the assault that threw the Iraqi forces out of Kuwait in 1991. His son, George W. Bush, orchestrated the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, after gaining the support of Congress. And recently, without involving the Congress, President Donald Trump has shifted the field of battle to economics by declaring a trade war against China.

In the News

Appeasement Of Evil Returns To Europe

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia American Thinker
Thursday, November 29, 2018

In a brilliant recent piece, historian Victor Davis Hanson dissects Macron's European army crackpot idea and points to the real reason aggressive militarism led to WWII: craven appeasement of international bullies by the democracies until it was too late.

Defending the Nation: Resources

by Bing West via Military History in the News
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

It is unremarkable to observe that America will fight a future war against an enemy much stronger than Islamist terrorists. War continues to be a central feature of world history due to the immutable nature of the human being. Understanding this, the leaders of all nations maintain armies to protect their nation states.

Featured

‘Churchill: Walking With Destiny’ Review: A Life At Full Pelt

by Tunku Varadarajan with Andrew Robertsvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, November 16, 2018

[Subscription Required] Some of the best accounts of Churchill’s life were written by Churchill himself, setting his biographers some daunting competition. How do you write more eloquently than a man who wrote prose so fine it was deemed worthy (in 1953) of a Nobel Prize in literature?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Strategika Issue 55: The Structure of World Power

via Strategika
Friday, November 16, 2018

Strategika Issue 55 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Related Commentary

America on Top

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Thursday, November 15, 2018

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has been the lone superpower that, if it’s so willing, can exert preponderant influence over the global, geostrategic, and geopolitical order. In a true sense, a bipolar or multi-polar world order whereby the U.S. is of equal status and influence with another “pole” or “poles” does not really exist.

Related Commentary

Regional Bipolarity, The New Global Model

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Thursday, November 15, 2018

The United States’ superpower monopoly endures, but only in the western hemisphere. There is no regional military or economic competitor, and ideological challengers have failed or remain strategically marginal. Elsewhere, the emerging model is regional bipolarity coincident with global economic tri-polarity (United States, China, European Union).

Pages

Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.