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Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Pacific Century: China Challenges Japan And Taiwan

interview with Michael R. Auslin, John Yoovia The Pacific Century
Friday, April 5, 2019

China Flexes Its Muscles; Will President Trump Respond?

Centennial SecretsFeatured

In Remembrance Of US Entry Into World War I

via The Hoover Centennial
Friday, April 5, 2019

Remembering the war that changed everything.  

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

U.S. Armed Forces On The Border With Mexico? We Never Left.

by Ralph Petersvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Amid threats to close the southern border of the United States, a benign U.S. military deployment along our frontier with Mexico remains a charged political issue. Yet, not only do the U.S. Armed Forces have a long history of serving on that border, they, in fact, never left it. Active U.S. Army installations, such as Fort Bliss near El Paso or Fort Huachuca in southern Arizona, serve as thriving testaments to an armed presence more than 170 years old: There is little new along the Rio Grande or under the Sonoran sun.

US Air Force Thunderbirds flying in formation
Interviews

Gary Roughead: Providing For The Common Defense

interview with Admiral Gary Rougheadvia 9/11 Memorial
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Gary Roughead discusses the landscape of the post-9/11 conflicts in the Middle East.

Centennial SecretsFeatured

The History Of Nuclear Warfare And The Future Of Nuclear Energy

via The Hoover Centennial
Friday, March 15, 2019

The first atomic strike in 1945 changed the world forever.

Interviews

What Began as a Very Positive Image-Boosting Initiative: Talking to Elizabeth C. Economy

interview with Elizabeth Economyvia Los Angeles Review of Books
Friday, March 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Economy discusses how China has fared on reaching its own official goals (for instance in terms of economic growth, governmental accountability, military power), as well as her new book The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State.

Policy Seminar with Gary Roughead, Mike McCord, and Roger Zakheim

Wednesday, February 27, 2019
Annenberg Conference Room, Lou Henry Hoover Building

Three commissioners of the National Defense Strategy Commission discussed the Commission’s assessment of the current National Defense Strategy.

Event
Featured CommentaryAnalysis and Commentary

China’s Tide Is High, But Is It At High Tide?

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

If China’s explosive economic growth since the beginning of reform in 1979 is a unique success story, no less impressive has been the concomitant growth of its military and political power, as well as its global influence. Few could have predicted that within one generation of Richard Nixon’s visit to Beijing in 1972, China would vie with the United States for the banner of global leadership. By any measure, China’s efforts to surpass American predominance in the world must be taken seriously, and in some cases, may even seem to have succeeded. 

Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

China Never Was A Superpower—And It Won’t Be One Anytime Soon

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

“The world by 2049 will be defined by the realization of Chinese power,” write Bradley Thayer and John Friend, referring to the centenary of the founding of the People’s Republic. “China,” these American academics tell us, “will be the world’s greatest economic and political force.” Must Americans accept the inevitability of Chinese dominance of the international system?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Political Correctness And History: In Defense Of Churchill

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Thursday, February 28, 2019

In October of this past year, the astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted a famous quote from Winston Churchill: “in victory, magnanimity.” For his troubles he received a host of outraged tweets from the politically correct crowd that Churchill was a racist, responsible for the 1943 famine in Bengal, and numerous other supposed atrocities as Britain’s leader during the Second World War. The tweets are a remarkable tribute to the widespread ignorance of the past among those who so delightedly cast their fury at the past.

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.