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Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Preparing For The Future

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, February 26, 2019

The use of history to think about the present and the future is always difficult for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important difficulty is that to use it successfully one has to have read deeply and widely in it, and even then, its potential lessons are ambiguous and uncertain. 

Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928
In the News

"Stalin: Waiting For Hitler": Talk By Stephen Kotkin

mentioning Stephen Kotkinvia Amherst College
Friday, February 22, 2019
"Stalin: Waiting for Hitler" is a talk by Stephen Kotkin, who is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is also a fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He directs Princeton's Institute for International and Regional Studies and co-directs its Program in the History and Practice of Diplomacy.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

On Grand Strategy And China

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, February 22, 2019

Whether one talks about grand strategy or military strategy, one must recognize both the crucial importance of means–end analysis, and also of geography. Not surprisingly, given the contempt the German military displayed towards strategic thinking in the two world wars they fought and lost, the Reich’s naval leaders and the Kaiser ignored those two crucial elements in developing the High Seas Fleet in the period before the Second World War.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

On Grand Strategy And Russia

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Vladimir Putin has proven himself a masterful tactician, who, as all tacticians do, maneuvers in the present with little regard for the future. He has managed to attack Georgia for its arrogance in daring to consider joining NATO, seize the Crimea, cause a nasty struggle in eastern Ukraine, and while destabilizing that state, launch a massive cyberattack on Estonia, assassinate various Russian defectors in the United Kingdom through the use of radioactive materials, and interfere in the 2016 elections in the United States along with other crimes and misdemeanors inflicted on his own people.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Ronald Reagan And Pope John Paul II: The Partnership That Changed The World

interview with Edwin Meese IIIvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Former attorney general Edwin Meese III explains the relationship between President Reagan and Pope John Paul II and how their collaboration helped end the Cold War.

Centennial Speaker Series

A Century of Ideas: Hoover’s One Hundred Years of War, Revolution, and Peace

Monday, November 4, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Stanford University

Historians Niall Ferguson and Victor Davis Hanson will discuss the seminal events of the last century—the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the rise and fall of Soviet communism, and the advent of modernism and globalization—and how Hoover Institution scholars, informed by the lessons of history, have interpreted these tragedies and challenges.

Event
Related Commentary

Another Reset with Russia? Sure, If We Accept the Unacceptable.

by Hy Rothsteinvia Strategika
Friday, February 15, 2019

Any reset with Russia must first assess whether Russia’s policy interests are reconcilable with the interests of the U.S. and NATO. For President Putin and Russian elites, the collapse of the Soviet Union was the worst calamity of the 20th century. Russians have always felt a deep-seated and occasionally real sense of vulnerability from the West. For many Russians, the security dilemma is very real.

Related Commentary

Nyet to the Reset

by Robert G. Kaufmanvia Strategika
Friday, February 15, 2019

Any reset with Putin’s increasingly illiberal and expansionist Russia is a triumph of hope over experience. Unrealistic realists underestimate the importance of ideology and regime type in assessing Russia’s calculus of its ambitions and interest.

In the News

How The US Actually Financed The Second World War

quoting Lee Ohanianvia Financial Times Alphaville
Wednesday, February 13, 2019

[Subscription Required] In March of 1951, a year into the Korean War, the US Treasury offered long-term notes at 2 3/4 per cent in exchange for short-term notes at 2 1/2 per cent. According to a narrative written half a century later by the Richmond Fed, the Federal Reserve supported the price of the long-term notes, but: only up to a limited volume it had agreed on with the Treasury.

Centennial Speaker Series

A Century of Ideas: The Big Three: Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill During the Second World War

Thursday, July 18, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Stanford University

During the Second World War, President Franklin Roosevelt, Premier Joseph Stalin, and Prime Minister Winston Churchill exchanged hundreds of cables and held two summit meetings, coordinating the vast allied effort to defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. Panelists will discuss why the peaceful new international order that the three agreed to establish after the conflict turned instead into the Cold War.

Event

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.