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Analysis and Commentary

Sorry, Banning Plastic Bags Won’t Save Our Planet

by Bjorn Lomborgvia The Globe and Mail
Monday, June 17, 2019

Last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a plan to reduce plastic pollution, which will include a ban on single-use plastics as early as 2021. This is laudable: plastics clog drains and cause floods, litter nature and kill animals and birds.

Interviews

Jonathan Rodden: Bloomberg Pledges $500 Million To Help Eliminate Coal

interview with Jonathan Roddenvia MSNBC
Friday, June 7, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jonathan Rodden discusses the realities behind eliminating coal and how Democratic candidates can use issues like climate change to win back rural voters.

Analysis and Commentary

Electricity From Large Dams Does Not Count As Renewable Energy

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Anna Caballero, a Democratic state senator from a district near me in California, had a proposal that I actually agreed with. She wanted the term “renewable energy” in California law to refer to–hold on to your hat–renewable energy.

Featured

Is Russia Preparing A Gas Nuclear Option?

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Forbes
Monday, May 13, 2019

Vladimir Putin is noted for taking surprise action, which confronts his victims with a fait accompli. They must then either accept the new unfavorable status quo or react in a way that they would consider too risky. Putin has employed this playbook in Georgia, Crimea, East Ukraine, Syria, on Ukrainian naval vessels in the Black Sea and to prop up the Maduro regime in Venezuela.

In the News

Doing Nothing About Climate Change The Most Expensive Option

mentioning George P. Shultzvia Duluth News Tribune
Sunday, May 12, 2019

A human-caused crisis threatened many of Earth's plant and animal species. The problem was in the atmosphere.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Eureka Issue 1902: Can You Dig It?

via Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

In this edition of Eureka, we look at the future of California infrastructure from three perspectives: what do with funds earmarked for high-speed rail; how to develop more sensible, integrated surface-transportation systems; and how one state lawmaker has proposed improvements to the dreaded drive up and down California’s Interstate 5, from the “Grapevine” to Sacramento.

Featured CommentaryEurekaAnalysis and Commentary

A Better Use For California High-Speed Rail Funds: Repurposing Federal Money To Water Storage

by Kevin McCarthy via Eureka
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

California has a long history of expanding access to water, Earth’s most precious resource.

EnvironmentAnalysis and Commentary

Earth (Day) To Governor Newsom: Why Didn’t You Ban Fracking?

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, April 25, 2019

Some Californians give Earth Day a symbolic nod—picking up litter on a beach, riding a bicycle to work to spare the air.

Analysis and Commentary

Bridging The Gap With The Science For Climate Action Network

by Alice Hill, Richard Moss, Bilal Ayyub, Mary Glackin, Katharine L. Jacobs, Jerry Melillo, T. C. Richmond, Lynn Scarlett, Dan Zarrillivia EOS
Thursday, April 4, 2019

A new report identifies missing support that is slowing progress in limiting and adapting to climate change. The Science for Climate Action Network aims to provide it.

Analysis and Commentary

It's Not Just The Military That Needs Help To Prepare For Climate Change

by Alice Hillvia The Hill
Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Climate change is a formidable enemy. It has burned our forests, stormed our coastal communities and dropped “rain bombs” across the nation. Just this past month, inland flooding deluged a key U.S. military base in Nebraska that serves as headquarters for the nation’s nuclear deterrent forces.

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Research Teams


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.

The Arctic Security Initiative addresses the strategic and security implications of increased Arctic activity and identifies opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.