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Interviews

Henry Miller: The Strange Facts Of Marketing The Regulated Organic Chicken

interview with Henry I. Millervia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, July 13, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Henry Miller discusses his American Greatness article "USDA Moves to End Rent-Seeking in Poultry Industry."

Analysis and Commentary

USDA Moves To End Rent-Seeking In Poultry Industry

by Henry I. Miller, Jeff Stiervia American Greatness
Wednesday, July 11, 2018

The U.S. Department of Agriculture in December ruffled a few feathers by withdrawing a regulation published on the final full day of the Obama Administration that would have created new requirements for producers of “organic” eggs and poultry.

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Flow West

by Terry Anderson, Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 9, 2018

A brisk trade in water rights would send supplies where they’re most needed.

Analysis and Commentary

We’ve Failed To Secure Our Coasts — We Must Build Resilience Before It’s Too Late

by Alice Hill, Roger-Mark De Souza, Katharine J. Mach, Christopher B. Field, Meaghan E. Parkervia The Hill
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

As record-setting rains pummel South Texas and Ellicott City struggles to recover from another deadly flood, we are experiencing more reminders that the United States is facing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. Last year’s hurricane season was the most expensive season to date — and arguably one of the most deadly on record. In the eight months since Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria struck our shores, are our coastal areas better prepared for the coming storms?

In the News

Snopes Deceives Again With CA Water Rationing 'Fact-Check'

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Patriot Post
Tuesday, June 12, 2018

"The laws do not render it illegal for Californians to do laundry and take showers on the same day."

Analysis and Commentary

The Neonic Ban: A Scientific Fraud Becomes Enshrined In EU Regulatory Law

by Henry I. Millervia Science 2.0
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Five years after the European Union imposed a temporary ban on neonicotinoid pesticides, an “experts committee” of the member states has now finally voted to make the ban permanent. This was hardly a surprise. The vote followed shortly after the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published their advisory opinion that neonics “represent a risk to wild bees and honeybees,” a finding that got banner headlines across Europe and the U.S.

Intellections

Green As Can Be: RPS vs LCPS – A Better Way To Reduce Carbon Emissions

by Terry Andersonvia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
Low Carbon Portfolio Standards are a more effective and affordable way to reduce carbon emissions because they expand the options utilities have to purchase low carbon electricity.
Just The Fracts

Top 5 Reasons Fracking Regulations Are Whack

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

The current approach to mitigating hydraulic fracturing’s risks is top-down, command-and-control government regulation. But this system is highly inefficient and ineffective at balancing the risks and rewards of fracturing. Why? Regulation imposes costs on consumers, typically benefits special interests, limits competition, and shields bad actors from liability. Meanwhile, property rights and water markets can better mitigate the risks, while also promoting the benefits.

Just The Fracts

Swipe Right: Seeking Fracturing Policy Alternatives

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Requiring hydraulic fracturing operators to tag their fracturing fluids with tracers helps enforce the property rights of others who may be harmed. This, in turn, enables more use of insurance, surety bonding, self-regulation, and third-party verification/certification to reduce and protect against the real but rare risks of fracturing. Property rights hold producers accountable and take advantage of fracturing benefits.

Just The Fracts

Getting The Fracts Straight

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

All forms of energy production have their risks, but scientific research suggests that hydraulic fracturing’s risks of water use, water contamination, or induced seismic activity from improper fluid disposal are rare, overblown, or easily mitigated. Like other energy productions, we have to weigh the risks and rewards. Estimates suggest fracturing will create almost 4 million jobs and pump almost $500 billion in the U.S.’s economy by 2035.

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Research Teams


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.

The Arctic Security Initiative addresses the strategic and security implications of increased Arctic activity and identifies opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.