Energy, Science & Technology

Energy

Filter By:

Subtopic

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

In the News

Doing Nothing About Climate Change The Most Expensive Option

mentioning George P. Shultzvia Duluth News Tribune
Sunday, May 12, 2019

A human-caused crisis threatened many of Earth's plant and animal species. The problem was in the atmosphere.

Interviews

Will Robots Take Over American Jobs? Elizabeth Cobbs And James Shelley Discuss Documentary, Claim “We Fear Things That Make Our Lives Better”

interview with Elizabeth Cobbsvia WGN Radio
Saturday, May 11, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Cobbs and James Shelley discuss their new PBS documentary, CyberWork and The American Dream.

In the News

Despite Facebook Co-Founder’s Call For A Breakup, Antitrust Experts Say It’s A Long Shot – Here's Why

quoting Nicolas Petitvia The Wrap
Thursday, May 9, 2019

Chris Hughes, who helped Mark Zuckerberg launch Facebook out of his Harvard dorm room in 2004, is calling for the social network’s breakup — but antitrust experts think the odds of that happening are as long as MySpace’s chances of once again becoming the world’s most popular networking site.

Interviews

Michael Auslin: Amazon Prime Video Unbowed By Red China's Censorship

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Friday, May 10, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses his National Review article"Amazon Prime Pulls back the Curtain on China’s Propaganda."

Essays

On “Forces of History”: Easy as One-Two- Three? Not Exactly

by Charles Hillvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The tension between the concepts of “civilization” and “the forces of history” can be tracked around the world from deep antiquity until at least the early 20th century. Since then, for many political reasons, neither the idea of civilization or historically transformative forces has been considered worthy of attention or even to possess intellectual legitimacy for serious world leaders. This may now however be changing as, for example, the European Union’s disregard for the continent’s civilization (as in the determination not to refer to Christianity in its draft constitutions) has troubled many.

Essays

The Democratic Distemper

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

I have been tasked to write on governance in the contemporary era, a time when many knowledgeable commentators believe that democracies across the western world are performing poorly in the face of new challenges arising from demographic and technological change. Commentary on the state of contemporary liberal democracy clearly tends toward the pessimistic: The vague and persistent feeling that democracies have become ungovernable has been growing steadily in western Europe. The case of Britain has become the most dramatic example of this malaise…

Essays

Governance Challenges to Infrastructure and the Built Environment Posed by Climate Change

by Alice Hillvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii sits two miles above sea level and over 2,200 miles from the nearest continent. For decades, scientists in this government laboratory have collected data on the atmosphere. In recent years, the world’s eyes have been fixed on a particular set of numbers coming out of Mauna Loa—readings of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), a key heat-trapping gas associated with climate change. Since the late 19th century, CO2 emissions have grown to unprecedented levels. In 2013, the daily average concentration of CO2 surpassed 400 parts per million for the first time in modern history. Emissions of CO2 continue to rise, reaching the largest amount ever recorded in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency. Greenhouse gas emissions have resulted in an increase of average global surface temperatures of approximately 1°C since the 1880s.

Essays

How Will Demographic Transformations Affect Democracy in the Coming Decades?

by Jack A. Goldstone, Larry Diamondvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

In 2007–2009 a major drought—the worst in forty years—struck northern Syria, the country’s agricultural breadbasket and a region that had already been suffering from loss of irrigation subsidies and water shortages. Syria’s young and fast-growing population meant that over a million people in the region were directly affected by the drought. In “the 2007/2008 agriculture season, nearly 75 percent of these households suffered total crop failure.” Hundreds of thousands left their lands and moved to the cities of Aleppo, Hama, and Damascus. Because Syria already was suffering from widespread popular discontent over political exclusion and corruption, these refugees added to the existing weight of urban misery and anger with the regime. Two years later, when a rebellion broke out in southern Syria, revolt quickly spread to these northern cities and precipitated civil war. The war in turn created millions more refugees, who spread to Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey, and then to Europe, where a sudden surge of over one million war refugees sought asylum in 2015.

From the Conveners

A Letter from the Conveners

via Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Sharp changes are afoot throughout the globe. Demographics are shifting, technology is advancing at unprecedented rates, and these changes are being felt everywhere. How should we develop strategies to deal with this emerging new world? We can begin by understanding it. First, there is the changing composition of the world population, which will have a profound impact on societies. Developed countries are experiencing falling fertility rates and increasing life expectancy. As working-age populations shrink and pensions and care costs for the elderly rise, it becomes harder for governments to afford other productive investments.

Interviews

Richard Epstein: FTC Duns Facebook For $5 Billion & What Is To Be Done? (Part 1)

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, May 9, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "The FTC Unfriends Facebook."

Pages

Research Teams


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.

The Arctic Security Initiative addresses the strategic and security implications of increased Arctic activity and identifies opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.