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Imagine What We Could Cure

by J.J. Plecs, John H. Cochrane via The Wall Street Journal
Sunday, November 25, 2018

[Subscription Required] The discovery that cigarettes cause cancer greatly improved human health. But that discovery didn’t happen in a lab or spring from clinical trials. It came from careful analysis of mounds of data.

In the News

California’s Forest Fire Tragedy

quoting Richard A. Epsteinvia AEI
Saturday, November 24, 2018

Every bit as important is the major change in the philosophy of land use management. Much of the forest land in California is now owned by the state and federal government.

Interviews

Richard Epstein On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Richard Epstein discusses his Defining Ideas article "California’s Forest Fire Tragedy."

In the News

We’re Going To Live In A World Of Bots. They Need To Be Polite.

quoting Barry R. Weingastvia The Washington Post
Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Many people — including roboticists, psychologists and philosophers — are trying to understand how the world will work when it is hard to distinguish artificial intelligence from human beings. Ordinary people often are creeped out when they discover that the “person” they thought they were interacting with is actually an AI. 

Governance In An Emerging New World: Emerging Technology and America’s National Security

Monday, February 25, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The United States finds itself in strategic competition with China and Russia at the same time as its traditional technological superiority faces emergent challenges. The participants will address how new military technologies might change the strategic dynamic in both Europe and in the Pacific and what these weapons may mean for non-state actors.

The Hoover Institution will host a public panel discussion "Emerging Technology and America’s National Security" on Monday, February 25, 2019 from 3:30pm - 5:00pm PST. The event will also be The event will also be streamed online at hoover.org/governanceproject.

Event

Governance In An Emerging New World: Europe

Monday, February 4, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

The Europe of the early 21st century is rapidly changing, as European institutions evolve, populations age, and new political forces emerge. The panelists will review how internet and communications technologies, new means of production, and rapid flows of people are affecting governance across the continent.

The Hoover Institution will host a public panel discussion "Europe in an Emerging World" on Monday, February 4, 2019 from 3:30pm - 5:00pm PST. The event will also be Livestreamed and can be viewed here.

Event

Governance In An Emerging New World: Africa

Monday, January 14, 2019
Hauck Auditorium, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Africa will be home to much of world’s population growth in coming decades, giving it a young, growing, and increasingly urbanized population. At the same time, it faces economic challenges and will acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. The discussion will explore what these demographic and environmental dynamics, alongside the promise of advancing technologies and new means of communications, will mean for governance and development across the continent.

The Hoover Institution will host a public panel discussion "Africa in an Emerging World" on Monday, January 14, 2019 from 3:30pm - 5:00pm PST. The event will also be Livestreamed and can be viewed here.

Event
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Flat Light

by Andrew Burt, Daniel E. Geer, Jr.via Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

The world of information security has always had reference points – or ground truths – that, like physical features in a landscape, served as navigational features for practitioners and policymakers alike. As time has passed and the state of information security has become more uncertain, these features have eroded. As reference points, they are now either unhelpful (at best) or disinformative (at worst). A deep state of disorientation is now upon us - in privacy, in security, and beyond. This paper explains how we arrived at this point, and suggests what to do next.

In the News

UCLA In The News

quoting John Villasenorvia UCLA
Monday, November 19, 2018

AI will make manufacturing, transportation, and trade more efficient, improve crop yields, open a wealth of new opportunities for technology advances, reshuffle labor markets, and force a fundamental rethinking of approaches to national security and the architecture of modern militaries.

Interviews

The Education Exchange: The Effect Of Information On College Aspirations

interview with Paul E. Petersonvia Education Next
Monday, November 19, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Paul Peterson discusses the paper he and Albert Chang wrote titled “Experimental Impacts of Customized Information on College Aspirations.”

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Research Teams


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.

The Arctic Security Initiative addresses the strategic and security implications of increased Arctic activity and identifies opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.