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Bytes, Bombs, and Spies

by Herbert Lin, Amy Zegartvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Offensive cyber operations have become increasingly important elements of U.S. national security policy. From the deployment of Stuxnet to disrupt Iranian centrifuges to the possible use of cyber methods against North Korean ballistic missile launches, the prominence of offensive cyber capabilities as instruments of national power continues to grow. Yet conceptual thinking lags behind the technical development of these new weapons. How might offensive cyber operations be used in coercion or conflict? What strategic considerations should guide their development and use? W

Interviews

Jack Goldsmith On The Lawfare Podcast

interview with Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jack Goldsmith discusses the early days of US and international climate action, how the Paris Agreement came into force and the predecessor agreements that gave rise to it, how it was supposed to operate, and what impacts President Trump's actions have had on international climate policy.

In the News

Doomsday Clock Frozen At Two Minutes To Apocalypse

quoting Herbert Linvia Milbank Monitor
Wednesday, March 27, 2019

The “new abnormal” the world is facing from risks like nuclear war and climate change has led the symbolic Doomsday Clock to be frozen at the closest it has ever been to midnight. The clock, created by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) in 1947, intends to warn of impending disasters.

Analysis and Commentary

The Resilient Design Imperative: A Call For Action

by Alice Hillvia Taylor and Francis Online
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Ellicott City, a historic patch of Maryland nestled between the Tiber and Patapsco rivers, regularly endures catastrophic flooding. Since the city’s official founding in 1772, severe floods have struck fifteen times, disrupting daily life and posing a constant challenge. One flood in 1768 even destroyed a grist mill built by one of the area’s first settlers along the banks of the Patapsco (Preservation Maryland 2016 Preservation Maryland. August 4, 2016.

Featured

Hoover IP2 To Convene Conference On Fourth Industrial Revolution In Brussels

quoting Stephen Haber, Richard Sousa, Nicolas Petit, Alexander Galetovicvia Hoover IP2
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

The Fourth Industrial Revolution—the fusion of digital technologies, characterized by big data, artificial intelligence, robotics, smartphones, and autonomous vehicles—will affect how people work, communicate, and travel. Hoover IP² has organized a conference, “Institutions and Regulation for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” that addresses a core public policy question: What institutions, policies, rules, and regulations will maximize individual benefits and economic surplus as the Fourth Industrial Revolution takes root?

In the News

Elizabeth Warren's Big Tech Plan Is A Solution In Search Of A Problem

mentioning John H. Cochrane via The Washington Examiner
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

That Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., doesn't know much about DNA testing or Cherokee heritage is well known. But then that's fine, she's not in the running to be leader of that nation, but of this one, which is where her lack of accurate information becomes more troubling. She is famously trying to break up Big Tech as that's a part and a sign of the increasing concentration of the economy.

 
In the News

Digital Gangster' Facebook To Appoint Content Reviewers

quoting Timothy Garton Ashvia IT Web
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Facebook is working on appointing an independent global oversight board, which will have the authority to review the social network's content decisions.

BusinessFeatured

How Many Of California’s 1.5 Million Food-Service Jobs Will Be Lost To The Minimum Wage?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

In 2022, California’s minimum wage will rise to $15 per hour (by 2023 for businesses with fewer than 25 employees), including restaurant workers. As one California food wholesaler, who services a number of restaurants, told me, “Get ready for the $25 lunch burger at your favorite decent, non–fast food restaurant.” 

IntellectionsFeatured

Nuclear Power: The Clean Energy Everyone Overlooks

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. via PolicyEd
Monday, March 25, 2019

As the world continues to shift toward low-carbon energy sources, a closer look makes it clear that nuclear power has to be included in order to reduce carbon emissions. Until the problem of long-term power storage is solved, nuclear will remain the only zero carbon base load power source. Given how clean and reliable it is compared to its alternatives, it is far too early to take nuclear power off the table.

In the News

The Beautiful Benefits Of Contemplating Doom

quoting Herbert Linvia Wired
Monday, March 25, 2019

Every year, in late January, a small group of beetle-browed scientists, politicians, and journalists gather at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, to ponder the end of the world. This is a day of solemn kitsch: the unveiling of the Doomsday Clock, the minimalist midcentury dataviz that, since 1947, has been adjusted to dramatize the imminence of global catastrophe.

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Research Teams


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.

The Arctic Security Initiative addresses the strategic and security implications of increased Arctic activity and identifies opportunities for shaping a safe, secure, and prosperous Arctic.