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Crime and Management

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Former San Jose, California, chief of police and Hoover fellow Joseph D. McNamara believes that if law enforcement were an industry, the nation's police force would qualify as a "mature organization saddled with a monopoly-minded culture." How McNamara turned the force in San Jose around.

The Imperial Judiciary—And What Congress Can Do About It

by Edwin Meese IIIvia Policy Review
Wednesday, January 1, 1997

Unelected federal judges are using their awesome power to usurp democracy from the American people.

The Debate in the United States over Immigration

via Books by Hoover Fellows
Wednesday, January 1, 1997

These essays examine economic, political, social, and legal issues related to immigration into the United States—from compelling arguments for limited immigration to forceful arguments for open borders. They assess the benefits and costs of immigration and its impact on education, social welfare, and health care.

Three Cheers for Three Strikes

by Dan Lungren via Policy Review
Friday, November 1, 1996

California enjoys a record drop in crime

Lessons from Abroad

by Heidi Goldsmithvia Policy Review
Friday, November 1, 1996

Shalom for at-risk youth

Redd Scare

by Joseph Locontevia Policy Review
Friday, November 1, 1996

A drill sergeant's brilliant assault on juvenile crime

Out of Order

by Steven G. Calabresivia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

Clinton's court and its assault on justice

Addicted to Failure

by Robert Portman via Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

National politicians must think locally to win the war on drugs

Abuses and Usurpations

by Jessica Gavoravia Policy Review
Sunday, September 1, 1996

Jessica Gavora on how the Clinton Justice Department is going to bat for violent prisoners

Culture Wars in America

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Analysis
Monday, July 1, 1996

Economic necessity forces immigrants and minority members to acquire the culture and speak the language of the majority. A non-English speaker who lives in a community in which many speak the language of his native land may never learn English. The same person might learn English quickly were he or she to find him- or herself in a community where only English is spoken.

Culture wars threaten to diminish America's ability to absorb new immigrants and to benefit from the diversity already present in our country. Much of the conflict is generated by government policy that reduces the incentives to become assimilated and exacerbates differences in the population. Education in one's native language, unbalanced immigration policies that result in large and stable ghettos, welfare availability, and encouragement of a multilingual society by allowing citizens to vote in languages other than English all reduce incentives to become assimilated. This essay explores patterns of cultural assimilation over time and makes policy recommendations that may bring a quicker end to the culture wars.

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