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Abuses and Usurpations

by Michael Lynch, Blake Hurstvia Policy Review
Thursday, May 1, 1997

San Francisco's Chinese Wall When Saving Doesn't Pay

Home Front

by Kristine Napiervia Policy Review
Thursday, May 1, 1997

Chastity programs shatter sex-ed myths

Take This Job and Love It

by Daniel Levinevia Policy Review
Thursday, May 1, 1997

Exposing the lies about low-paying work

The Smart Samaritan

by James L. Paynevia Policy Review
Thursday, May 1, 1997

Five habits of highly effective charities

One Nation Under God

by Barbara von der Heydtvia Policy Review
Thursday, May 1, 1997

Tough medicine for welfare moms

Shamed by the Same Sad History

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Shelby Steele argues that the thought of ending affirmative action scares all Americans, black and white. We cannot end racial preferences until we look our fears in the face.

Why I Gave Up Marxism

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell began his intellectual career as a disciple of Karl Marx. What changed his mind? Read on. A slice of the essential Sowell.

Cosmic Justice and Human Reality

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell examines the very concept of equality, concluding that it is "one of the crucial far-fetched ideas of our time." Sowell at his most analytically acute-and politically incorrect.

Portrait of Thomas Sowell

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

The author of thirty-one books, Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell is blunt and exacting. An appreciation of a scholar with no time for "navel-gazing and hand-wringing."

Black Students Need to Be Taught, Not Indoctrinated

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Black students need to be given good teaching and held to high academic expectations. They don't need ebonics. By Hoover fellow Shelby Steele.

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