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New Issue Of Hoover Digest Online

via Hoover Daily Report
Monday, July 10, 2017

The latest issue of Hoover Digest is now available online.

Essays

China and the US Strategic Construction of Cybernorms: The Process Is the Product

by Duncan B. Hollisvia Aegis Paper Series
Thursday, July 6, 2017

This paper explores the role norms play in advancing U.S. interests in changing Chinese behavior in cyberspace.  It compares and contrasts U.S. efforts to achieve two norms:  (1) the U.N. Group of Governmental Experts’ consensus that international law applies in cyberspace; and (2) the U.S.-China understanding that neither State would pursue cyber-espionage for commercial advantages.  In contrast to prior studies that focus only on the behavior a norm requires, this paper employs a broader, process-based analysis.  That analysis offers a new framework for strategizing about the potential risks and rewards of pursuing different normative processes, whether in U.S. efforts to impact China’s behavior in cyberspace or vice-versa. 

Essays

The 2016 Presidential Election—Identities, Class, And Culture

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, June 22, 2017

In the aggregate the 2016 election returns were similar to those in 2012, but the consequences of the voting were dramatically different. This contrast highlights the fact that in a majoritarian system like that in the United States minor changes in the vote can produce major changes in government control and the public policies that result. Looking ahead, perhaps the most significant feature of the 2016 voting was the reappearance of anti-establishment “populist” sentiments that are roiling the politics of other advanced democracies.

Essays

Ayatollah Machiavelli

by Karim Sadjadpourvia Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, June 20, 2017

The Islamic Republic of Iran and its Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei have arguably become the most powerful country, and leader, in the Middle East. A Machiavellian combination of ruthlessness, radicalism, and realism—underpinned by a 2500-year history of subtle statecraft—has helped Tehran fill political vacuums created by the Iraq war and Arab uprisings. Though American and Iran share numerous common interests—and adversaries—as long as Iran continues to define itself as a revolution rather than a nation-state cooperation will be minimal, containment will be necessary, and confrontation may be unavoidable

Books

Israel Facing a New Middle East

by Itamar Rabinovich, Itai Brunvia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, June 8, 2017

New challenges, new realities: Israel’s national security strategy In Israel Facing a New Middle East, Itamar Rabinovich and Itai Brun discuss the evolution of Israel's national security, military doctrine, and policies in light of today's challenges and changes in the Middle East. With an emphasis on two key periods—the years 1979 to 1982 (and their subsequent impact) and the current Middle Eastern turmoil—they review national security strategy, the cabinet level’s national security policy, and the Israel Defense Forces’ (IDF) military strategy.

Books

America and the Future of War

by Williamson Murrayvia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, June 8, 2017

The end of war? History tells us not likely. Throughout the world today are obvious trouble spots that have the potential to explode into serious conflicts at any time in the immediate or distant future. This study examines what history suggests about the future possibilities and characteristics of war and the place that thinking about conflict deserves in forming American strategy in the coming decades. The author offers a historical perspective to show that armed conflict among organized political groups has been mankind’s constant companion and that America must remain prepared to use its military power to deal with an unstable, uncertain, and fractious world.

Essays

The Follies Of Democracy Promotion

by Samuel Tadrosvia Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, June 6, 2017

President Obama’s election was warmly greeted in Egypt by both the country’s leader and population. In Cairo, Obama promised a new beginning, not only in America’s relationship with Egypt, but the whole Muslim world. By the time he left office, the American Egyptian relationship was in shambles. In this essay, Samuel Tadros examines the illusions that shaped Obama’s adventure in Egypt in pursuit of an imaginary transition to democracy, offering a cautionary tale for the Trump administration. If the US Egyptian alliance is to be strengthened and Egypt is to survive the regional upheaval, President Trump should forgo the illusions Washington holds about the country and base his strategy toward Egypt not on Egypt as it should be, but on Egypt as it is.

Essays

Chinese Cyber Diplomacy In A New Era Of Uncertainty

by Adam Segalvia Aegis Paper Series
Friday, June 2, 2017

After initially taking a relatively defensive, reactive position on the global governance of cyberspace, China under President Xi Jinping has adopted a more activist cyber diplomacy. This foreign policy has three primary goals: limit the threat that the internet and the flow of information may pose to domestic stability and regime legitimacy; shape cyberspace to extend Beijing’s political, military, and economic influence; and counter US advantages in cyberspace and increase China’s room of maneuver. Measured against its objectives, China’s diplomacy would appear relatively successful. The greatest uncertainty for Beijing moving forward is the state of US-China relations.

Total Volunteer Force by Hoover fellow Tim Kane
Essays

Total Volunteer Force

by Timothy Kanevia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Tim Kane identifies and examines the underlying causes of personnel dysfunction in the US armed forces and suggests specific, decentralizing reforms to Pentagon policies. His proposals aim to move personnel strategies further along the spectrum of volunteerism, emphasize greater individual agency during all stages of a US military career, and restore command authority to colonels and captains that has been missing since the centralization of the 1960s.

Essays

Jihadism On Its Own Terms

by Cole Bunzelvia Hoover Institution Press
Wednesday, May 17, 2017

In this essay Cole Bunzel argues that jihadism, the modern movement in Sunni Islam identified with al-Qaida and the Islamic State, is best understood on its own terms, rather than in terms of terrorism, violent extremism, or the larger Islamist movement. Examining the jihadis’ own writings and ideas and emphasizing their self-perception as a distinct movement—“the jihadis,” “the jihadi current”—he explains the nature and contours of their movement as it has developed during the past decades to the present day. As jihadism grows increasingly popular, it has also become increasingly divided.

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Thinking about the Future
By George P. Shultz

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Hoover Institution Press is the publishing arm of the Hoover Institution. Dedicated to informing public policy decisions and communicating key ideas, the press publishes the works of Hoover's fellows, working groups, and affiliated scholars. Concepts that were important to Herbert Hoover—private enterprise, personal freedom, representative government, peace, and safeguarding the American system—continue to animate our work. Areas emphasized are economics, national security, education, energy and the environment, health care, history, law and regulation, and political philosophy.

 

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