Daniel Heil

Research Fellow
Biography: 

Danny Heil is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution whose focus is on the federal budget, tax policy, and the federal antipoverty programs.

Heil’s interests include replacing failed policies with state and federal initiatives that alleviate poverty by encouraging workforce participation and human capital development. He has also written on the perils of telecommunication regulations and the economic effects of e-business.

Heil served as Governor Jeb Bush’s economic policy adviser during the 2016 presidential campaign, counseling him on the federal budget, tax policy, and the federal antipoverty programs.

Heil received a master’s of public policy degree with a specialization in economics and American politics from Pepperdine University.

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Recent Commentary

Policy InsightsFeatured

A Better Way To Fix Infrastructure

by Joshua D. Rauh, Lee Ohanian, Daniel Heil, Tom Churchvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, June 17, 2020

American infrastructure is need of an overhaul. But, as we learned in the last edition of Policy Insights, government-funded projects often fail to live up to their lofty goals. The problem isn’t that dollars aren’t being spent on infrastructure. Instead, it is that the money is being spent poorly.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Infrastructure

by Russell Roberts, Lee Ohanian, Michael J. Boskin, Richard A. Epstein, John B. Taylor, John F. Cogan, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, May 28, 2020

With COVID-19 wreaking havoc on the economy, some in Congress are proposing a large increase in infrastructure spending. Supporters claim that increased spending will boost the economy while ensuring future generations will benefit from improved transportation, power, and communication systems. But will increased federal spending on infrastructure deliver on these promises, or are there reasons to be skeptical?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Area 45: Daniel Heil: Binge-Watching, Binge-Spending

interview with Daniel Heilvia Area 45
Thursday, May 14, 2020

Why any serious conversation about fiscal and entitlement reform is years way at best.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Federalism

by John Yoo, Clint Bolick, Milton Friedman, David Davenport, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 30, 2020

Across much of the world, national governments have responded to the coronavirus pandemic by ordering nonessential businesses to close and residents to shelter in place. In the United States, in contrast, the orders did not originate from the national government; instead, local and state governments took charge.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Fixing The Way We Regulate

by Michael J. Boskin, Richard A. Epstein, David R. Henderson, Lee Ohanian, John Yoo, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, March 26, 2020

Health care is not the only industry where regulations often do more harm than good. From state and local policies on housing and labor rules to federal environment and banking laws, misguided regulations can hurt the economy, reduce opportunities for workers, and limit choices for consumers.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Energy Policy Insight

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr., Michael J. Boskin, James L. Sweeney, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, February 20, 2020

Over the last quarter century, the United States has experienced a dramatic transformation. With little fanfare, an energy revolution has occurred that has profoundly altered the nation’s economy, its national security, and its environment. No longer beholden to foreign nations to meet its energy demands, the United States now produces more energy than it consumes.

Blank Section (Placeholder)FeaturedHealth Care

The Fiscal Effects Of The Public Option

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Analysis
Monday, January 27, 2020

Supporters of a federal public option contend that a government-run health plan will reduce federal deficits. These projected deficit savings are predicated on two major, but unrealistic, assumptions. First, public option proposals assume that the government will reimburse hospitals and providers at rates lower than paid by private insurers. Second, the proposals require plan premiums to fully cover plan costs. 

Policy InsightsFeaturedPolitics

Fixing The Way We Tax

featuring Edward Paul Lazear, John H. Cochrane, David R. Henderson, Richard A. Epstein, Michael J. Boskin, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Friday, December 13, 2019

With the election less than a year away, presidential candidates are eagerly releasing new proposals that promise to rebuild the nation’s infrastructure, expand access to health care, and reduce college tuition. The one thing all of these ideas have in common is that they will be expensive. And unless candidates are willing to increase federal deficits that already exceed a trillion dollars, these expensive ideas mean raising someone’s taxes.

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