Daniel Heil

Policy Fellow
Biography: 

Danny Heil is a policy fellow at the Hoover Institution whose focus is on the federal budget, tax policy, and the federal antipoverty programs.

Heil’s interests include replacing failed policies with state and federal initiatives that alleviate poverty by encouraging workforce participation and human capital development. He has also written on the perils of telecommunication regulations and the economic effects of e-business.

Heil served as Governor Jeb Bush’s economic policy adviser during the 2016 presidential campaign, counseling him on the federal budget, tax policy, and the federal antipoverty programs.

Heil received a master’s of public policy degree with a specialization in economics and American politics from Pepperdine University.

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Recent Commentary

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Medicare At 60: A Preliminary Overview

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Analysis
Tuesday, April 27, 2021

In April 2020, then-presidential-candidate Joe Biden proposed lowering the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 60. Surprisingly, Medicare at 60 and its likely consequences—from how many people it would cover to its fiscal costs— have not been explored in much depth.2 The current proposal comes with several unanswered policy questions. Would coverage be mandatory or voluntary? Would new recipients be subject to the same rules as traditional Medicare enrollees or have their own rules? Would late-enrollment penalties apply to individuals who wait until 65 to enroll? 

Policy InsightsFeatured

Capitalism Vs. Socialism

featuring Edward Paul Lazear, Lee Ohanian, Joshua D. Rauh, John F. Cogan, Daniel Heil, Terry Anderson, Scott W. Atlas, Russell A. Bermanvia PolicyEd
Thursday, April 22, 2021

Over the last century countries have experimented with variations on both capitalism and socialsm. So how do socialism, capitalism, and their many variants compare?

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Tax Rate Hikes And The Economy

by Daniel Heil featuring John H. Cochrane, Michael J. Boskin, Joshua D. Rauh, Milton Friedman, John F. Coganvia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Thursday, February 18, 2021

As a candidate, Biden proposed a series of tax rate increases on high-income families to pay for some of his new programs. What would these tax rate hikes look like, and what would they do to the economy?

Analysis and Commentary

A Public Option For Health Insurance Could Be A Disaster, Especially In Times Of Crisis

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Stat
Thursday, February 11, 2021

In a step to help more Americans get health insurance, President Biden signed an executive order creating an additional opportunity for Americans to sign up for subsidized coverage on the health insurance marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act.

Policy InsightsAnalysis and Commentary

Tax Rate Hikes And The Economy

featuring John H. Cochrane, Michael J. Boskin, Joshua D. Rauh, Milton Friedman, John F. Cogan, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Thursday, February 11, 2021

As a candidate, Biden proposed a series of tax rate increases on high-income families to pay for some of his new programs. What would these tax rate hikes look like, and what would they do to the economy?

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Economic Shocks And Probable Expansions To A Public Option

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Analysis
Thursday, February 4, 2021

A politically realistic public option would have significant impacts on America’s future fiscal condition. These impacts would be exacerbated by the kinds of economic shocks, such as recessions, that our country has seen on a fairly regular basis.

EssaysFeatured

The Economic Impact Of A Universal Basic Income

by John F. Cogan, Daniel Heilvia Socialism and Free Market Capitalism: The Human Prosperity Project
Thursday, January 14, 2021

At various times throughout our nation’s history, a wave of collectivist sentiment has swept the country. These waves, born out of a deep disenchantment with current circumstances, are often characterized by a fervent, but mistaken, belief that society can be improved by subordinating the interest of the individual to centralized government control. We are experiencing such a collectivist wave today. Riding atop this populist wave is a strong sentiment that government should use its power to tax to redistribute income from rich to poor. A popular policy instrument for this redistribution is the universal basic income (UBI).

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What Goes Wrong When Government Interferes With Prices

by Daniel Heil featuring Russ Roberts, Lee Ohanian, Lanhee J. Chen, John H. Cochranevia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Prices are a fact of life, and so is complaining about them. You probably prefer lower prices on just about everything, but especially when buying a house or paying for college, and you wish for higher prices when it comes time to sell that house or negotiate your salary. Complaints aside, prices are the key to widespread prosperity.

Policy InsightsAnalysis and Commentary

What Goes Wrong When The Government Mandates Prices

featuring Russ Roberts, Richard A. Epstein, Milton Friedman, Thomas Sowell, Lee Ohanian, John H. Cochrane, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Prices contain vital information. Too often, governments interfere with them. In an attempt to protect consumers, politicians mandate lower prices. Other times, governments push prices up to benefit certain industries. These efforts might be well intentioned, but they distort the information that prices convey and tend to make us poorer.

Policy InsightsFeatured

Reasons To Be Thankful

featuring Edward Paul Lazear, Russ Roberts, Stephen Haber, Russell A. Berman, Michael R. Auslin, General Jim Mattis, Daniel Heilvia PolicyEd
Tuesday, November 24, 2020

The year 2020 will not be remembered as a year of progress. But we shouldn’t forget that people in the 21st century are wealthier and freer than at any other time in history. As we approach the holiday season, let’s explore the many reasons we should be thankful, even in 2020.

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