David Brady

Davies Family Senior Fellow, Emeritus
Research Team: 
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Biography: 

David Brady is the Davies Family Senior Fellow, Emeritus at the Hoover Institution and the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science in the Stanford Graduate School of Business.  

He has published seven books and more than a hundred papers in journals and books.  Among his most recent books are Leadership and Growth (World Bank Publications, 2010) with Michael Spence, Revolving Gridlock: Politics and Policy from Carter to Bush II (Westview Press, 2006), and Red and Blue Nation? Characteristics and Causes of America’s Polarized Politics with Pietro Nivola (Brookings Institution Press, 2007).  His recent articles include “Why Is Health Care Reform So Difficult?” with Daniel Kessler, Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, April 2010; “Putting the Public’s Money Where Its Mouth Is”  with Daniel Kessler, Health Affairs: The Policy Journal of the Health Sphere, August 2009, pages 917–25; “Leadership and Politics: A Perspective from the Growth Commission,” with Michael Spence, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 25, no. 2 (2009): 205–18; “The 2010 Elections: Why Did Political Science Forecasts Go Awry?” with Morris P. Fiorina and Arjun Wilkins, 2011.

Brady has been on continual appointment at Stanford University since 1986, where he has served as associate dean for Academic Affairs in the Graduate School of Business (GSB) and as vice provost for Distance Learning.  He has twice been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1987.  He presently holds the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professorship in Ethics at the Business School and was deputy director of the Hoover Institution from 2004-2014.

During his teaching career, he won the Dinkelspiel Award for service to undergraduates, the Richard Lyman Prize for service to alumni, the Bob Davies Award and the Jaedicke Silver Cup from the GSB, and the first Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award given at Stanford.  He also won the George Brown Teaching Award at Rice University.

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Recent Commentary

Interviews

‘Bidenomics’: Evolution Or Revolution?

interview with David Bradyvia Goldman Sachs
Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Hoover Institution fellow David Brady talks about whether Biden’s economic agenda represents a new progressive era in the US and/or how big of a shift in US economic policy Bidenomics truly represents as well as the implications for the economy.

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: Party Like It’s 2010?

interview with David Brady, Douglas Rivers, Bill Whalenvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Thursday, June 24, 2021

Where do Republicans and Democrats depart on COVID vaccines and immigration, plus whether a 2022 midterm election could resemble 2010’s referendum on the Obama presidency.

Matters of Policy & Politics
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Matters Of Policy & Politics: Return To Normalcy?

interview with David Brady, Douglas Rivers, Bill Whalenvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Thursday, April 15, 2021

Do Democrats run the risk of a backlash in the 2022 midterm elections if they over-reach on hot-button issues such as immigration, gun control, voting rights and packing the Supreme Court?

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Dems Say Not Leaning Left Will Hurt In '22. Data Say Otherwise.

by David Brady, Brett Parkervia Real Clear Politics
Wednesday, March 3, 2021

President Biden faces pressure from the progressive wing of his party on issues ranging from the $15 minimum wage to the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill to climate change legislation. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told the Washington Post in mid-January that Biden’s stimulus proposal doesn’t go far enough and some have claimed that not moving further left will have dire electoral ramifications. Bernie Sanders recently echoed AOC’s concerns, tweeting “In 1994, Democrats in power lost big because they were not bold. In 2010, it happened again. 

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This Is How Biden Eked Out His 2020 Victory

by David Brady, Brett Parkervia The Washington Post
Friday, February 12, 2021

In a divided country, elections are won on the margin.

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Hoover Poll: Amid Our Divides, Is Unity Attainable?

by David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Real Clear Politics
Monday, February 1, 2021

Prior to the traditional Labor Day kickoff of the 2020 presidential election, we conducted the first in a planned biannual Hoover Poll using a random sampling of approximately 2,000 respondents. In addition to election-related issues, the poll explores three major themes: governmental power and liberty; social and environmental justice; and populism. The responses reported below are weighted to reflect population average demographics.

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Vital Signs: A Poll of the Nation from the Hoover Institution

by David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Hoover Institution
Monday, February 1, 2021

Vital Signs: A Poll of the Nation from the Hoover Institution takes a non-partisan bi-annual pulse of the American electorate. It explores three major themes: governmental power and liberty; social and environmental justice; and populism. The survey was designed by scholars at the Hoover Institution and the data were collected by YouGov, a global polling firm, between August 24-31, 2020. The sample of 2,005 adults was selected from YouGov’s panel to be representative a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults in terms of age, gender, race, education, and vote in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The margin of error is approximately plus or minus three percentage points.

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Area 45: A Post-Trump Realignment?

interview with David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Matters of Policy & Politics
Monday, January 18, 2021

Did a genuine realignment occur in 2020 or will the 45th president’s impact fade away?

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The State Of America’s Disunion

by Michael Spence, David Bradyvia Project Syndicate
Monday, November 23, 2020

The 2020 US presidential election followed a pattern very similar to the contest in 2016, with narrow margins in a few key counties determining the outcome in battleground states. And the record-breaking turnout on both sides was a sign not of a healthy democracy but of an anxious one.

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David Brady And Doug Rivers: The 2020 Election: What The Polls Did And Didn’t Get Right | Hoover Virtual Policy Briefing

interview with David Brady, Douglas Rivers, Bill Whalenvia Fellow Talks
Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Hoover Institution fellows Dave Brady and Doug Rivers discuss the 2020 election and what the polls did and didn’t get right.

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