John B. Taylor

George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Econometric Society (elected fellow)
Economics Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award
(2015)
Biography: 

John B. Taylor is the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at the Hoover Institution and the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He chairs the Hoover Working Group on Economic Policy and is director of Stanford’s Introductory Economics Center.

Taylor's fields of expertise are monetary policy, fiscal policy, and international economics. His book Getting Off Track was one of the first on the financial crisis; his latest book, First Principles, for which he received the 2012 Hayek Prize, develops an economic plan to restore America’s prosperity.

Taylor served as senior economist on President Ford's and President Carter’s Council of Economic Advisers, as a member of President George H. W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, and as a senior economic adviser to Bob Dole’s presidential campaign, to George W. Bush’s presidential campaign in 2000, and to John McCain’s presidential campaign. He was a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 2001. From 2001 to 2005, Taylor served as undersecretary of the Treasury for international affairs where he was responsible for currency markets, international development, for oversight of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and for coordinating policy with the G-7 and G-20.

Taylor received the Bradley Prize from the Bradley Foundation and the Adam Smith Award as well as the Adolph G. Abramson Award from the National Association for Business Economics. He was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Award for his overall leadership at the US Treasury, the Treasury Distinguished Service Award for designing and implementing the currency reforms in Iraq, and the Medal of the Republic of Uruguay for his work in resolving the 2002 financial crisis. At Stanford he was awarded the George P. Shultz Distinguished Public Service Award, as well as the Hoagland Prize and the Rhodes Prize for excellence in undergraduate teaching. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society; he formerly served as vice president of the American Economic Association.

Taylor received the 2016 Adam Smith Award from the Association of Private Enterprise Education and the 2015 Truman Medal for Economic Policy for extraordinary contribution to the formation and conduct of economic policy.

Taylor formerly held positions as professor of economics at Princeton University and Columbia University. Taylor received a BA in economics summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1968 and a PhD in economics from Stanford University in 1973.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

More Evidence on Why the Stimulus Didn’t Work

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Saturday, October 30, 2010

Polls show that most Americans don't believe that the stimulus package worked, but debate continues among economists. The most debated issue is the size of government purchases multiplier. Suppose that the government purchases multiplier is 1.5.

Analysis and Commentary

More Evidence on Why the Stimulus Didn't Work

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Saturday, October 30, 2010

Polls show that most Americans don't believe that the stimulus package worked, but debate continues among economists...

A New Normal for Monetary Policy?

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Wednesday, October 27, 2010

A year and a half ago when the Fed’s extraordinary quantitative easing (QE) was shifting from emergency liquidity programs to large scale asset purchases, we convened a conference at Stanford’s Hoover Institution to discuss the shift.

Analysis and Commentary

A New Normal for Monetary Policy?

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Wednesday, October 27, 2010

A year and a half ago when the Fed’s extraordinary quantitative easing (QE) was shifting from emergency liquidity programs to large scale asset purchases, we convened a conference at Stanford’s Hoover Institution to discuss the shift...

Cash for Clunkers in a Macro Context

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, October 25, 2010

More empirical studies are demonstrating that temporary fiscal stimulus actions are a poor way to get the economy moving again on a sustainable basis. More permanent and predictable policies are much better.

Analysis and Commentary

Cash for Clunkers in a Macro Context

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Sunday, October 24, 2010

More empirical studies are demonstrating that temporary fiscal stimulus actions are a poor way to get the economy moving again on a sustainable basis...perhaps the clearest case is the “cash for clunkers” program of July and August 2009...

Taylor on QE2

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, October 18, 2010

CNBC’s Steve Liesman interviews John Taylor on Fed action and the possibility of additional quantitative easing:

John Taylor on the Role of Central Banks

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Monday, October 11, 2010

In a C-SPAN televised event at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs, John Taylor and Charles Goodhart summarize their papers on the role of central banks, and Alice Rivlin and Chr

Debating QE2

by John B. Taylorvia Advancing a Free Society
Friday, October 8, 2010

John Taylor discusses "QE2," quantitative easing, on CNBC with Larry Meyer, James Bullard, Steve Liesman, and host Carl Quintanilla.

Analysis and Commentary

Beware of Announcement Effects When Assessing Policy Interventions

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One (blog)
Thursday, October 7, 2010

The effects of exchange market interventions are frequently estimated by looking at what happened on the day of the announcement of the intervention or of the intervention itself...

Pages