John Yoo

Visiting Fellow
Biography: 

John Yoo is a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution, professor of law at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall), and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. From 2001 to 2003 he served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Legal Council in the Justice Department of President George W. Bush. Professor Yoo is the author of a number of books, most recently of Crisis and Command: A History of Executive Power, From George Washington to George W. Bush.

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Analysis and Commentary

Finally, The Supreme Court Is Taking Up Gun Rights Again

by James C. Phillips, John Yoovia Los Angeles Times
Sunday, January 27, 2019

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court granted review of a case involving the constitutional right to keep and bear arms. The case challenges a New York City law that prohibits transporting handguns, even licensed and unloaded ones, to places outside of the city, including to a second home or a shooting range.

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Are There Limits on Emergency Powers? With John Yoo and Richard Epstein

interview with Richard A. Epstein, John Yoovia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, January 25, 2019

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Richard Epstein and John Yoo deconstruct presidential powers concerning the government shutdown, the Mueller investigation, and the potential for impeachment by the Democrat-controlled House.

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Are There Limits On Emergency Powers? With John Yoo And Richard Epstein

interview with John Yoo, Richard A. Epsteinvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, January 25, 2019

Richard Epstein and John Yoo deconstruct presidential powers concerning the government shutdown, the Mueller investigation, and the potential for impeachment by the Democrat-controlled House.

Analysis and Commentary

The Supreme Court Should Make Politics Local Again

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

With President Trump in the Oval Office, liberals who sought broad national powers during the Obama years have discovered the virtues of federalism. On issues from immigration to the environment to drug policy, they rely on states’ rights to chart a path at odds with that of Washington, D.C.

Analysis and Commentary

The Courts Won’t Stop Trump’s Emergency Declaration Or His Border Wall

by John Yoovia Los Angeles Times
Friday, January 11, 2019

President Trump’s threat to declare a national emergency and build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border may not be sound policy, but the president’s critics are wrong when they say he cannot constitutionally do it. If Trump makes good on his plans, he would almost certainly win in court.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Free Speech’ Means Just That

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Monday, December 31, 2018

A too-broad interpretation of the Constitution’s free-speech clause protects things that have nothing to do with speech and makes other clauses superfluous.

Analysis and Commentary

2019 Could Be An Incredible And Historic Year For The Supreme Court – Here’s Why

by John Yoovia Fox News
Sunday, December 30, 2018

The year ahead has the potential to be historic for the U.S. Supreme Court. With Justice Brett Kavanaugh replacing the inconsistent Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, conservatives have a majority on the court for the first time since 1936.

Analysis and Commentary

Comey’s Anti-Trump And Pro-Hillary Bias In 2016 Clear From New Developments – Why Was The Russia Probe Begun?

by John Yoovia Fox News
Saturday, December 22, 2018

In the Watergate scandal that ultimately forced him to resign from office, President Nixon tried to use the CIA and FBI to target his political enemies and to carry out dirty tricks to help him win re-election in 1972.

Featured

More On The Free-Exercise Clause And Religious Exemptions

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Despite a pair of recent responses by Ramesh Ponnuru and another by Professor Vincent Philip Muñoz, we continue to view the original understanding of the Constitution’s free-exercise clause to require exemptions to otherwise generally applicable laws except under certain conditions, such as harm to individuals, danger to the public, or the infringement of equal rights. 

Analysis and Commentary

An End To Racial Preferences At Last?

by John Yoo, James C. Phillipsvia National Review
Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The Supreme Court could be ready to rule that racial discrimination is illegal, even if it is purportedly done for a good cause.

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