Matthew Waxman

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Analysis and Commentary

Why a cybersecurity treaty is a pipe dream

by Matthew Waxman, Adam Segalvia Global Public Square (CNN.com)
Thursday, October 27, 2011

For the foreseeable future, progress toward [a vision of cyber security and freedom] will be incremental and achieved through multiple arrangements hammered out with a wide array of state and private actors rather than through a global accord...

Analysis and Commentary

Libyan Limbo

by Matthew Waxmanvia Foreign Policy
Thursday, June 2, 2011

Six reasons why it's been so tough to get Qaddafi to quit...

In the News

Cyber-Attacks and the Use of Force: Back to the Future of Article 2(4)

by Matthew Waxmanvia Yale Journal of International Law
Friday, April 1, 2011

Suppose that the United States, in opposing Iran's suspected development of nuclear weapons, decides that the best way to halt or slow Iran's program is to undermine the Iranian banking system...

The Debate over U.S. Libya Intervention

by Matthew Waxmanvia Council on Foreign Relations
Monday, March 28, 2011

With the UN Security Council-authorized military strikes on Libya in full swing, legal debate in the United States is focused on whether, as a matter of U.S. constitutional law, the president may unilaterally order U.S. forces to participate in those operations without going to Congress for permission.
 

In the News

The Debate Over U.S. Libya Intervention

by Matthew Waxmanvia Council on Foreign Relations
Monday, March 28, 2011

With the UN Security Council-authorized military strikes on Libya in full swing, legal debate in the United States is focused on whether, as a matter of U.S. constitutional law, the president may unilaterally order U.S. forces to participate in those operations without going to Congress for permission...

Terrorism: Why Categories Matter

by Matthew Waxmanvia Terrorism and Political Violence, volume 23:19–22, 2011
Friday, December 17, 2010
Is terrorism war, crime, neither, or something in between? I generally agree with Etzioni that contemporary terrorism threats do not fit well within the legal paradigms of either war or crime and that, therefore, new domestic and international legal rules tailored to terrorism challenges may be needed. However, I caution against...

Future Challenges: Obfuscation and Candor Self-Defense & Limits of WMD Intelligence

by Matthew Waxmanvia Analysis
Monday, June 14, 2010

Then-candidate Obama stated during the 2008 campaign that "the experience of Iraq underscores that often perceived threats are not as real [as] they may seem, and our intelligence may be imperfect. 

In the News

Future Challenges E-Book

by Peter Berkowitz, Philip Bobbitt, Tod Lindberg, Jessica Stern, Matthew Waxman, Benjamin Wittesvia Future Challenges in National Security and Law
Thursday, June 10, 2010

In the new online volume, Future Challenges in National Security and Law, members of the Hoover Institution’s Koret-Taube Task Force on National Security and Law and guest contributors offer incisive commentary on the controversies that have erupted over national security law in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, laying the foundations for understanding such future issues...

Future Challenges

by Peter Berkowitz, Benjamin Wittes, Tod Lindberg, Jessica Stern, Philip Bobbitt, Matthew Waxman, Jack Goldsmith, Kenneth Anderson, Amy Zegartvia Analysis
Tuesday, June 1, 2010

The Future Challenges essay series, a collaborative effort of Hoover’s Koret-Taube Task Force on National Security and Law, is an online volume that explores a variety of emerging national security and law challenges, including the crafting of rules for the detention of unlawful enemy combatants, the proper orientation for the United States toward the International Criminal Court, the deradicalization of terrorists, application of the principle of proportionality to asymmetric warfare, developments in the war-powers doctrine, cyber-warfare, the search for and regulation of weapons of mass destruction, and the reform of Congressional oversight of intelligence.

The Structure of Terrorism Threats and the Laws of War

by Matthew Waxmanvia Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law, Vol. 20, 2010
Wednesday, May 26, 2010

This article considers a major debate in the American and European counterterrorism analytic community – whether the primary terrorist threat to the West is posed by hierarchical, centralized terrorist organizations operating from geographic safe havens, or by radicalized individuals conducting a loosely organized, ideologically common but operationally independent fight against western societies...

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