Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, the latest of which is The Second World Wars (Basic Books), which was released in October 2017. His other books include The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

In the News

Why The Media Blew It

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia ArkansasOnline
Monday, February 4, 2019

The media reporting on the Covington kids/Lincoln Memorial story was disgraceful, to the point where the story ultimately became not what actually happened that day--there is, after all, no intrinsic newsworthiness in a teenager supposedly "smirking" at a nutjob banging a drum--but how the media eagerly constructed and then tried to impose a thoroughly fake narrative upon the American public.

Featured

How To Make It Home In California: Rules For The Modern Odysseus

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, February 3, 2019

I drove back from San Francisco not long ago to the rural San Joaquin Valley. It is only 200 miles. But in fact, it can feel like Odysseus trying to get back home to Ithaca from Troy. Walking to the car in San Francisco was an early morning obstacle course dotted with the occasional human feces and lots of trash. 

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On John Carlson (26:45)

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia 570 KVI
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson talks about Tom Brokaw's "assimilation" comment and punditry reaction. 

Immigration Reform
Analysis and Commentary

Trump And The Latino Vote

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Trump would not have to change his policies to capture 40 to 50 percent of the Latino vote (which is quite different from “Latino” spokespeople on television and the Jorge Ramos crowd), as opposed to simply articulating them.

Featured

Much Has Changed For The Better Since 2016—Not That Trump Will Get Credit

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

The news obsesses over the recent government shutdown, the latest Robert Mueller arrest and, of course, fake news—from the BuzzFeed Michael Cohen non-story to the smears of the Covington Catholic High School students.

Analysis and Commentary

On Assimilation

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

The idea of rapid assimilation, integration, intermarriage, and Americanization was once melting-pot clear. Immigrants arrived in the U.S. eager to find something better (whether economically, politically, culturally, or socially) than what they left behind.

In the News

Why Has Emotion Replaced Reason In America?

quoting Victor Davis Hanson, Niall Fergusonvia The Trumpet
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

“Facts are stubborn things.” That’s what American founding father John Adams famously said. But in modern America, facts are not so stubborn, and you don’t get famous by clinging to them. You get famous by being stubborn with your emotions. In modern America, more stubborn than facts, truth and logic are emotions, feelings and “personal truth.”

Featured

The Progressive Race To The Bottom

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Abolishing ICE, offering ‘free’ college to all, raising taxes to 70 percent. ... Will the somnolent GOP take notice?

Featured

Attack Of The Techno-Lynch Mob

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, January 27, 2019

The Covington Lie offered the perfect occasion for the electronic mob to pounce—after temporarily licking its wounds following the BuzzFeed fake news hysteria. And it did so without shame or even much regret after the fact, as Jason Leopold, the BuzzFeed fabulist, ceded center stage to a kindred serial prevaricator, Nathan Phillips. The latter in his 15 minutes of fame did not make a major statement that was not contradicted by an earlier statement or by the facts.

Analysis and Commentary

The Issue Is Not Roger Stone’s Lurid Personal Life But Equality Under The Law

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Sunday, January 27, 2019

The issues of special Robert Mueller’s indictment of Roger Stone have nothing to do with his personal life. His sexual habits should be of no concern to anyone. And what is so funny about the Internet jokes about (a still presumed innocent) Stone enjoying rape once he’s in prison? The issues are instead threefold: One, given that Stone has said so many contradictory things, were his public statements lies and his sworn statements true, vice versa, neither or both?

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