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Syria-Iraq: Limiting Iranian Influence Implies Returning To Realpolitik

by Fabrice Balanchevia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, October 5, 2017

Destroying the Islamic State (IS) and limiting the influence of Iran is a difficult project. The United States has more capabilities in Syria than in Iraq to destroy IS and limit Iran. The Sunni Arab tribes of the Euphrates Valley no longer support the Islamic State and are ready to join those who will liberate them, which explains the effectiveness of the Syrian Democratic Forces (Kurdish-Arab) against IS. Thus the liberation of Raqqa could thus take place in fall 2017, provided Turkey does not launch an offensive against the Syrian Kurds.

The GOP after DACA: No one Left to Lie To

by Jeremy Carlvia National Review Online
Friday, September 15, 2017
If they pass an amnesty, party elites will have no one left to lie to.

New Russian Tanker Makes One of the Fastest Arctic Crossings

quoting Lawson W. Brighamvia Live Science
Wednesday, August 30, 2017

A Russian ship just made one of the fastest crossings along an Arctic shipping route without the help of a chaperone icebreaker ship, in part because the ship itself functions as an icebreaker and in part because of diminished Arctic sea ice, likely as a result of climate change.

‘Is this the Day the Internet Dies?’

by Jeremy Carlvia National Review
Friday, August 18, 2017

When I wrote my recent article for NRO arguing that we must regulate Internet monopolies as public utilities, I had no idea how timely it would become. I submitted it to NR on Friday afternoon (The day before Charlottesville) with the plans to run it on Monday. The news out of Virginia kicked everything back a bit and it ended up running on Tuesday. By Tuesday night, perhaps coincidentally, Tucker Carlson was making the same argument on his popular TV show.

Fiscal policies and the prices of labor: a comparison of the U.K. and U.S.

by Casey B. Mulliganvia Springer Open
Friday, August 11, 2017

This paper measures the 2007–13 evolution of employment tax rates in the U.K. and the U.S. The U.S. changes are greater, in the direction of taxing a greater fraction of the value created by employment, and primarily achieved with new implicit tax rates. Even though both countries implemented a temporary “fiscal stimulus,” their tax rate dynamics were different: the U.S. stimulus increased rates, whereas the U.K. stimulus reduced them. The U.K. later increased the tax on employment during its “austerity” period. Tax rate measurements are a first ingredient for cross-country comparisons of labor markets during and after the financial crisis.

Long-Term Issues For Central Banks

by Jaime Caruana, Kevin Warshvia Bank for International Settlements
Wednesday, August 9, 2017

The global political, economic and financial landscape is constantly evolving. Some of the changes may prove short-lived. But others may be slow-moving and persistent, and only detectable over time as evidence accumulates. Although central banks’ day-to-day operations and policymaking tend to focus on near- or medium-term developments, longer-term trends and structural changes will at some point come into the picture – not least because of their impact on the economic relationships that are central to policy formulation and analysis.

The Arctic Waterway To Russia’s Economic Future

by Lawson W. Brighamvia The Wilson Quarterly
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The economic stakes are high and there are several challenges and uncertainties around the bend, as Russia tries to make the most of its northern gateway to global markets.

Silicon Valley’s Foolish Amnesty Push

by Jeremy Carlvia National Review
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The tech industry’s most prominent leaders favor mass immigration, for no good reason.

The US Arms Control And Disarmament Agency In 1961–63

by James Goodbyvia Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Public policy issues involving a complex mix of problems, exemplified today by climate change and the threat of nuclear war, require governance by institutions whose mandates and cultures embrace technological expertise as well as diplomatic and military skills. This paper is a case study of how such an institution operated during the Kennedy Administration to deal with the growing threat of radioactive debris in the environment and the threat of nuclear proliferation, and also put US-Soviet relations on a new trajectory. The 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty might not have been concluded during the Kennedy Administration had the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency not been established in 1961.

On The Prospects For Higher Economic Growth

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, John B. Taylor, Kevin Warshvia Analysis
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Hoover and AEI economists release white paper on comprehensive economic policy reforms to achieve 3 percent growth.

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