Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

No Grounds for Claim that Obamacare Lowers Healthcare Costs

by Charles Blahousvia e21, Economic Policies for the 21st Century
Monday, November 25, 2013

Public support for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has plummeted now that the oft-repeated claim that “If you like your health care plan, you can keep...

Analysis and Commentary

Peace for Our Time

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)
Sunday, November 24, 2013

The Iranian agreement comes not in isolation, unfortunately. The Syrian debacle instructed the Iranians that the Obama administration was more interested in announcing a peaceful breakthrough than actually achieving it. The timing is convenient for both sides: The Obama administration needed an offset abroad to the Obamacare disaster, and the Iranians want a breathing space to rebuild their finances and ensure that Assad can salvage the Iranian-Hezbollah-Assad axis. The agreement is a de facto acknowledgement that containing, not ending, Iran’s nuclear program is now U.S. policy. After all, to what degree would an Iranian freeze really retard development of a bomb, or simply put it on hold? In other words, has Iran already met some of its requirements for weaponization, and now simply wishes to take a breather, rebuild its economy, and strengthen its image in the West — before the final and rather easy development of a deliverable bomb? If the sanctions are not only lifted, but incentives are added in place of them, why then would Iran not agree to dismantle completely elements of its program that exceed domestic energy purposes? (Or for that matter, why would a nation with among the world’s largest reserves of gas and oil feel the need to fund an expensive nuclear energy program in the first place?) Aside from the details of this new Sword of Damocles pact, one wonders about the following: In the case of violations, will it be easier for Iran to return to weaponization or for the U.S. to reassemble allies to reestablish the sanctions? Will Israel now be more or less likely to consider preemption? Will the Sunni states feel some relief or more likely pursue avenues to achieve nuclear deterrence? Will allies like Japan or South Korea feel that the U.S. has reasserted its old global clout, or further worry that their patron might engage in secret talks with, say, China rather than reemphasize their security under the traditional U.S. umbrella? The president’s dismal polls are only a multiplier of that general perception abroad that foreign policy is an auxiliary to fundamental transformation at home, useful not so much to create international stability per se, as to enhance Obama influence in pursuing his domestic agenda. Collate reset, lead from behind, “redlines,” “game-changers,” ”deadlines,” the Arab Spring confusion, the skedaddle from Iraq, Benghazi, the Eastern European missile pullback, and the atmosphere is comparable to the 1979–80 Carter landscape, in which after three years of observation, the opportunists at last decided to act while the acting was good, from Afghanistan to Central America to Tehran. There is not a good record, from Philip of Macedon to Hitler to Stalin in the 1940s to Carter and the Soviets in the 1970s to radical Islamists in the 1990s, of expecting authoritarians and thugs to listen to reason, cool their aggression, and appreciate democracies’ sober and judicious appeal to logic — once they sense in the West greater eagerness to announce new, rather than to enforce old, agreements.  

Analysis and Commentary

Two Amazing Charts

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Saturday, November 23, 2013

Research by Christopher Erceg and Andrew Levin is providing solid evidence that the decline in the labor force participation rate since 2007 has been due to cyclical factors--the recession and slow...

Analysis and Commentary

Paul Gregory's Case Against JFK Assassination Conspiracy

by David R. Henderson with Paul R. Gregoryvia EconLog
Friday, November 22, 2013

The New York Times versus the New York Times

Analysis and Commentary

Uncommon Knowledge With David Mamet

with Peter M. Robinson, David Mametvia Wall Street Journal Live
Friday, November 22, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Fact, Democrats, and the JFK Legend

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Friday, November 22, 2013

Was Kennedy a liberal in today’s sense of the word?

Interviews
Interviews

Peter Berkowitz on the John Batchelor Show (30:39)

with Peter Berkowitzvia John Batchelor Show
Friday, November 22, 2013

Guests: Ben Protess, NYT. Ty Rogoway, AviationIntel. Mary Anastasia O'Grady, WSJ. Peter Berkowitz, Hoover.  

In the News
In the News

Joel Mokyr on Growth, Innovation, and Stagnation

with Russell Robertsvia EconTalk
Monday, November 25, 2013

Joel Mokyr of Northwestern University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the future of the American economy. Mokyr rejects the claims that the we are entering an area of stagnation or permanently lower economic growth. He argues that...

In the News

U.S. Got Played by Iran

with Victor Davis Hansonvia Boston Herald
Monday, November 25, 2013

As world leaders both praised and panned the United States’ deal to ease sanctions on Iran in exchange for curbing its nuclear activity, one

In the News

Will the NSA Be Reformed?

with Amy Zegartvia Los Angeles Times
Sunday, November 24, 2013

Remember Edward Snowden ? For a while, the National Security Agency 's renegade contractor seemed like the most influential man in American intelligence, even though he's been hiding out in Moscow. Snowden's disclosures touched off a wave of enthusiasm in Congress for reforming the NSA's surveillance practices — and anger overseas when he revealed that American spies were listening to foreign leaders' cellphone calls.